StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces - Assignment Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Cultural diversity pertains to a society where people with different cultural systems co-exist (Pedersen & Connerley, 2005). Religion is one of the many factors that provide diversity to a society…
Download full paper File format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER94.6% of users find it useful
Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces
Read Text Preview

Extract of sample "Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces"

Download file to see previous pages These are all sacred places with spiritual significance to their believers, although their exact functions and related rituals somewhat vary for each religion.The Ka’ba in Mecca, the Wailing Wall, and the Bodhi Tree are the holiest sites because of what they represent to the history of these religions. The Wailing Wall, also called the Western Wall, is the holiest site for Judaism because it is the last remaining wall of the Second Temple. The First Temple refers to Solomon's Temple. This temple, however, was destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 BCE. The Jews rebuilt the Temple, which the Romans destroyed in 70 CE. For several centuries, the Jews went to the Wailing Wall to cry over the destruction of their Second Temple. The Ka’ba is the holiest place for Islam. It is the heart of their hajj, or spiritual pilgrimage, and is located inside the Grand Mosque in Mecca. Muslims believe in the centrality of the Ka’ba as a sacred place of their faith – it is the space inside it, rather than Mecca itself, which is seen as consecrated (Morgan, 2010). Many Muslims think that Adam had built the original Ka’ba but it then was ruined by the Great Flood (Morgan, 2010). The Bodhi Tree is also the holiest place for Buddhists because it is the tree where Buddha attained enlightenment (Harvey, 1990). The original Bodhi tree and its progeny are treated as relics because they symbolize Buddha’s enlightenment (Harvey, 1990). Enlightenment, or being awakened, is also called the wisdom of emptiness. It means that individual existence is not possible since everything is interconnected (Harvey, 1990). The importance of enlightenment to Buddhism portrays the role of the Bodhi Tree in the attainment of this process. The Ka’ba and the Bodhi Tree have mystical origins that the Wailing Wall does not possess. The Ka’ba contains the sacred black stone that Abraham and Ishmael placed there (Morgan, 2010). Pre-Islamic worship believes that the stones of the Ka’ba came from heaven (Morgan, 2010). The Bodhi Tree has miraculous qualities. It is believed to be cut before and to have grown again miraculously the next night (Harvey, 1990). The Wailing Wall does not have any mythical source because it is a man-made creation. Its importance lies in its historical and social functions. These sacred places are centers of prayer or spiritual meditation, although they also serve social purposes. The Wailing Wall enhances the attachment of the people to their Jewish history and identity. It signifies their “displaced sense of persecution and religious compensation” (Heyd, 1999, p.22). The Western Wall acts as a place of prayer and community activities. The Jews have commonly inserted prayers into the wall cracks because of the belief that they will come true. The custom of inserting written prayers into the wall is so extensive that some American-Jewish newspapers take advertisements of services of putting in such prayers for sick Jews. Moreover, Jewish families often gather near the wall to celebrate social events, such as their children’s bar mitzvah, which is a party for boys who turned thirteen. The Ka’ba and the Bodhi Tree are distinct places of worship. Muslims and Buddhists go to these places as part of their pilgrimage. People go there to pray, to assert their faith, and to strengthen their religious communities. Like the Wailing Wall, these sacred sites reinforce the connection between believers and their relationship to their faith. Similar rituals are conducted around the Ka’ ...Download file to see next pages Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces Assignment”, n.d.)
Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces Assignment. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1457555-cultural-diversity-and-diverse-sacred-spaces
(Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces Assignment)
Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces Assignment. https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1457555-cultural-diversity-and-diverse-sacred-spaces.
“Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces Assignment”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1457555-cultural-diversity-and-diverse-sacred-spaces.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces

The Role Played by Cultural Difference in International Politics

The discourse of multiculturalism is inconsistent. To its advantages belongs preservation of cultural pluralism, recognition, and protection of the diverse minority, refusal from xenophobia, chauvinism, and racial prejudices. Lacks are shown in ethnisation of social relations, the institutionalization of cultural distinctions, ignoring the liberal principle of priority of the rights of an individual.

The culture of any nation, defining its spiritual uniqueness, expressing its creative power and abilities, simultaneously is a property of all mankind. “According to official multiculturalism, no individual is forced to retain his or her culture, but all cultures are granted a universal right to celebrate and even to...
9 Pages (2250 words) Essay

Cultural History Versus Political History: The Varying Methods of the Two Fathers of History

Even though they have these similarities and have both been bestowed with the same title, these two historians drastically differed in their approaches.

Herodotus had another title bestowed upon him; he was also called the “Father of Lies.” Much of what is known of him has been gathered from his own writings as few other sources are available from his actual life. It should also be noted that the veracity of this information is in question as Herodotus was known to invent much in his own work, and it was sometimes the practice in Ancient Greece to attribute events from the life of one person to another; for instance, it has been questioned if the accounts of Herodotus’ exile are only due to the fact th...
10 Pages (2500 words) Essay

Diversity in Education

There is a form of cultural imperialism that exists within countries and that is, arguably, destructive of personality and helps create school failure where success is possible. Moroccan children in Belgium, Turkish children in Germany, Pakistani and West Indian children in Britain, Algerian children in France, African-American, Hmong, and Latino children in the United States are alienated from their own cultures in their schools and learn to feel marginal to the mainstreams of thought and behavior in many of the communities in which they live. This type of cultural imperialism exists throughout the world, not merely in highly industrialized countries. It affects how Basarwa children are taught in Botswana's Kalahari Desert, how m...
7 Pages (1750 words) Case Study

The Cultural Representatives of of Neolithic Period

In the years when climatic conditions were extremely cold, enormous ice sheets covered the seas, while in the inter-glaciations period, due to the melting of the glaciers, the sea level rose considerably, submerging vast landmasses. The flora and fauna of landmasses corresponded to changes due to the climatic and geological conditions, and man or homo- sapiens fashioned their lives in accordance with all these changes.
Traditionally, the periods in prehistory take their names from the kind of material or technology that was used to make tools. Thus, archaeologists have divided the various periods in time as Paleolithic (Old Stone) Age, Neolithic (New Stone) Age, Copper Age, Bronze Age, and Iron Age, which are further divided...
51 Pages (12750 words) Thesis

The Social and Cultural Contexts of Deviance

Generally, deviance is a behavior that is seen as harmful, disruptive, or criminal. However, it may come as the result of being statistically unique. This brings into question whether there can be positive deviance. For example, if a student got straight A+ grades, the Underachievers Club may view them like a deviant. As a group, they may place sanctions on them above and beyond what they would the average student. This illustrates the concept that deviance must be seen through the lens of the social or cultural context that it takes place in (Keel, 2008).
Social norms are the types of behavior that are established and maintained by society and are considered to be acceptable. Because deviance is the transgression of a norm a...
9 Pages (2250 words) Literature review

Response of Effective Leaders to Diverse Team Environments

An effective leader is the one who adapts to the changing scenarios in terms of the team he leads and also in terms of the circumstances that the team faces. Herscovitch and Meyer (2002) have confirmed that workplaces are faced with endless change (s), and Paton and McCalman, (2000) have further stated that effective management of that change is an important competency currently required by an organization

Advancement in technology, travel options, communications and liberalization of international business regulations has incorporated numerous possibilities of conditions with diverse natures within the work environment. This trend was found to increase in the early nineties. The transference of a command-driven economy...
7 Pages (1750 words) Case Study

Maintaining Credibility in a Diversity Classroom

 The reason for choosing the above universities for research purposes is stated by the authors as: “The academy is a microcosm of the larger society in which we live and that America and all Western society remain provinces in which white men, and some White women, of a particular class and with particular dominant ideologies determine the nature of all of our existences” (Perry et al, 2009, p.83). The article is well researched and presents data gathered from surveys and other quantitative methods used to gauge the responses of the instructors to the questionnaire presented to them.

The second article is more to do with addressing the question of diversity in schools and the ways and means to make it p...
6 Pages (1500 words) Article

Diversity Management in Organisations

...Managing Diversity in Workforce Contents Introduction 2. Diversity Management: Challenges and Benefits 2 3. Managing Diversity 3 3 Significance of Involvement culture 3 3.2 Impact of Organizational Ethnicity on diversity 4 4. Best Practices to Manage Diversity 4 5. Conclusion 5 6. Bibliography 6 1. Introduction “Diversity” characterizes the massive amount of individual divergences that subsists amid persons. Workforce diversity is a gathering of the resemblances and discrepancies between workers in such sorts as “age, sexual category, cultural inheritance, physical capability and race.” (POLLITT, David, 2006) As of today, diversity in the place of work is widely acknowledged as an advantage that contributes to a business institution’s base...
6 Pages (1500 words) Case Study

Cultural Relativism: Female Circumcision and Infanticide

in context’ (Dilley, 1999, 1), an investigative technique espoused to explain, and definitely make some reasonably genuine sense of, information from ethnography. The suggestion is that anthropologists who attempt to understand social and cultural trends do so with ethnographic materials, hence, to something referred to as ‘cultural relativism’.
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usefulness of cultural relativism in addressing social and cultural phenomena, such as female circumcision and infanticide, through the use of ethnographic materials. The evidently simple idea that it is a relativism that provides shape to our interpretation poses significant concerns about the definition and application o...
8 Pages (2000 words) Assignment

Cultural Communication

...CULTURAL COMMUNICATION SELF-ASSESSMENT PAPER Cultural communication is a very interesting to analyze in light of globalization and the interconnectedness of different cultural communities throughout the world. Evaluating one’s own cultural background is difficult to do from an objective standpoint. It is also even more difficult to understand how one’s cultural background affects our communication styles with people from our own culture as well as with people from other cultures. With the aim of understanding cultural communication fully, the following will provide a nice overview of my own cultural background. Following this, I will explain the communication style of my culture and then look at how my cultural background influences...
7 Pages (1750 words) Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Assignment on topic Cultural Diversity and Diverse Sacred Spaces for FREE!

Contact Us