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Hip Hop from Sub Cultuer to Pop Culture - Research Paper Example

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The conception of hip hop as an African-American subculture could not possibly have foreseen the impact it could have on the huge masses it currently…
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Hip Hop from Sub Cultuer to Pop Culture
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"Hip Hop from Sub Cultuer to Pop Culture"

Download file to see previous pages Over the years, this culture has been used as an expressive form of art, where most people used it to speak against the systems that seemed oppressive. Despite the changing times, this popular culture seems to be doing the same, albeit a little differently.
Hip hop, over the years, has been identified as a subculture developed by the African-American and Latino communities in the South Bronx. Developed in the 1970s, hip hop was seen as a means of stylistic rebellion, which would draw or set the Africa-American population apart from the rest. The evolution of hip hop from an ethnic subculture to what has become popular culture has taken time, but it is fair to say that through the media, the hip hop culture has become a global phenomenon. The concepts, ideas, and values that surround hip hop enable this phenomenon to traverse borders, leading to the growth of the hip hop movement across the globe (Persaud, 2011). Its spread to urban and suburban communities has enabled this phenomenon to be one of the biggest cultures in the world, having traversed racial and social lines to be embraced by different people from all walks of life. This paper will examine some of the basic elements behind the hip hop culture, and why it was accepted as an art form by people from different parts of the world.
During the 1970s, the concentration of minorities, represented largely by Blacks and Hispanics, in New York led to the creation of hip hop to speak against some of the evils that were being witnessed. The movement of the white population into the suburbs left the city with the minority groups, who had to endure high costs of social services and a lack of financial support, which eventually led to the emergence of ghettos. Gang violence erupted as a result of the high unemployment rates (Emdin, 2013). A high percentage of the youth in the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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