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Separation of Powers in the UK - Essay Example

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In the paper “Separation of Powers in the UK” the author evaluates separation of powers, which has been implemented whereby the branches of the state, that is, the legislature (parliament), the executive (government) and the judiciary functions independently…
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Separation of Powers in the UK
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Download file to see previous pages For example, if the parliament has more control over the others, there will be instability in the government. There has been the development of the UK government in achieving balance between the government and the parliament through application of the principle of separation of powers. In 1998, the Human Rights Act was launched by the parliament requiring consideration of the European Convention of Human Rights by the judiciary. Recently, the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 was geared towards separation of powers through the judicial reforms. The Act required abolishment of the offices of the Lord Chancellor and establishment of a Supreme Court of UK without the consent of the judiciary at that time (Masterman 2011, p. 34). Following the development in separation of powers in the UK government, the three branches function independent of each other. The current UK government constitutes of the legislature whose role is to pass laws and supervise their implementation, the executive, whose role is to implement laws, and the judiciary, whose role is to administer justice by ensuring compliance to the laws. The Parliament of the UK comprises the House of Commons, the House of Lords and the Crown. The main roles of the Parliament include passing laws and following their implementation by the executive, the Government (Madgwick 1991, p. 23). The Parliament in conjunction with the Government played a great in the implementation of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 that resulted to the establishment of the Supreme Court following the abolishment of the Lord Chancellor’s powers that undermined separation of powers. The Act dismissed the Lord Chancellor as the Speaker of the House of Lords, an effort towards separation of powers. The Parliament is privileged as it is granted the freedom to speech. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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