Foreign Direct Investment in the Case of Iran - Dissertation Example

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This examination represents a look into the past that seeks to uncover historical information as to the flow of foreign direct investment in Iran, along with the political, internal, and economic variables that have and are impacting on the foregoing…
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Foreign Direct Investment in the Case of Iran
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Download file to see previous pages 3.2.3 FDI in Iran - 1988 to 1995 60
3.2.4 FDI in Iran 1996 to 2003 66
3.2.5 FDI in Iran - 2004 to 2007 to present 73
4.0 Analysis of Findings 83
5.0 Conclusion 103
Bibliography 106
TABLES / CHARTS AND FIGURES
FIGURES
Figure 1 - Map of Iran 16
Figure 2 - GDP Growth Rate, Iran, 1960 - 2002 39
Figure 3 - Iran Sources of Economic Growth (Raw Labour) 39
Figure 4 - FDI in Iran, Selected Countries and the World
1971 through 1979 43
Figure 5 - FDI in Iran, 1971 through 1979 44
Figure 6 - FDI in Iran, and Neighbouring Countries for Comparison
1971 through 1979 45
Figure 7 - Iran FDI 56
Figure 8 - FDI for Iran and Comparative Nations 1980 to 1987 57
Figure 9 - FDI for...
This study seeks to delve into and analyze the flow of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) with respect to Iran from an historical as well as present day perspective, looking at how the impact of sanctions have affected this area. In addition to the foregoing, this examination shall look at the FDI inflows of neighbouring countries as a comparative analysis to equate the FDI inflows to Iran as a gauge on its receipts. Foreign Direct Investment has larger implications for developing economies and economies in transition as these funds, as well as expertise aid in heightening and improving the production and efficiency performance of industry sectors that aids in economic growth. This study will look at the preceding, incorporating facts and figures dating back to 1971 that shall be broken up into periods that correspond to political developments and or major periods of economic sanctions that thus would impact FDI inflows.
The global economy, in today’s terms, has more meaning and applicability than ever before as demonstrated by the recent sub-prime mortgage meltdown that has seen every economy suffer reversals as a result of the impact of tightened credit, the ripple effect of bank failures, massive slowdowns in production and consumer spending.
The study concludes that Iran has managed to survive long enough, meaning the first three examined period reviewed, so that since 1996 it not longer is concerned with, if it ever was, sanctions. The economic performance of Iran reflects the impact of sanctions between 1980 through 1994, but as shown, the economy has begun its upward direction again. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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