Nobody downloaded yet

Figurative Language vs. Literal Language - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Thus it is incumbent upon writers and speakers to use figurative language where necessary, in formal contexts. This is of great importance in the world of today because of the increasing readership across the globe which is made possible by the advancement in print and online media. …
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER99% of users find it useful
Figurative Language vs. Literal Language
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Figurative Language vs. Literal Language"

Download file to see previous pages According to Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language, in figurative language “figures of speech such as metaphors and similes freely occur...they are regarded as embellishments that deviate from the ‘ordinary’ uses of language.” On the other hand, literal language “suggests the influence of the letter as a measure of strictness and rightness... If something is done literally, a person follows instructions ‘to the letter’, without flexibility or imagination.” (1998)
It is common for people to misuse or overly use figurative words in written or spoken language. Consequently, the minds of the readers or listeners start focussing on the language, rather than what it implies. Thus, it hinders the productivity of the thought process by engaging the mind to concentrate on words, or phrases rather than their meanings in a particular context. Following is an attempt to define the meanings and functions of a few words according to Oxford Reference Online that are often used interchangeably in different contexts.
2.Idiom
“A phrase or grammatical construction that cannot be translated literally into another language because it’s meaning is not equivalent to that of its component words. ” A simple idiom like ‘bring home the bacon’ means to earn money or success or profit. Consider the confusion it makes in contexts like:
We planned to host a sumptuous dinner on Thanksgiving. I decided to prepare a delicious sweet potato, bacon and pomegranate salad, and bacon-roasted turkey. Everyone was looking forward to Thanksgiving as the year had been really tough and both, John and I had to work really hard to bring home the bacon.
...
(Vega-Moreno, 2007, p.189) 3. Amphiboly Amphiboly is a “kind of ambiguity in which the linguistic context allows an expression to be taken in more than one way. There are several types, and writers differ over which to include out of: ambiguous grouping or scope.”2 Consider this statement: I wanted to become a fashion model for eight years. This statement is ambiguous because it implies two meanings: I have wanted for the past eight years to become a fashion model; or I want to be a fashion model for only eight years. 4. Analogy Analogy is the “respect in which one thing is similar to another. Arguing by analogy is arguing that since things are alike in some ways, they will probably be alike in others.”3 In debates or arguments, analogy is used to prove that if A is equal to B, and if B is equal to C, then by analogy, A is equal to C. While such inference might be true in mathematical domains, it is likely to generalize facts and thus obstruct critical thinking. 5. “Flame-word” Flame words are words that convey expressions like anger, fury, hatred, insults etc. As such words carry emotional meanings; therefore they carry compound impressions. For example: May you burn a million years in hell is based upon figurative language. 6. Metaphor “The most important figure of speech, in which one subject-matter (sometimes called the tenor) is referred to by a term or sentence (the vehicle), that does not literally describe it: the ship of state, the light of faith, etc.”4 “...consider the thematic similarity among the metaphoric expressions that are used to describe a love relationship in this fictitious “break-up” speech: Dearest, we’ve come a long way since we first met, but ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Figurative Language vs. Literal Language Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/philosophy/1429611-figurative-language-vs-literal-language
(Figurative Language Vs. Literal Language Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words)
https://studentshare.org/philosophy/1429611-figurative-language-vs-literal-language.
“Figurative Language Vs. Literal Language Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/philosophy/1429611-figurative-language-vs-literal-language.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Figurative Language vs. Literal Language

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...? Figurative language versus literal language October 24, Figurative language versus literal language Every language comes with a plethora of ways to color a message that someone is trying to convey or else to provide a creative way to help prompt an understanding between people. This can be done whether the words are written or spoken. Unfortunately, if someone does not know how to properly use certain language devices, such as those that make up figurative speech, they risk confusing the person that they are trying to communicate with. Not only will...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Figurative Language Versus Literal Language

...?Assignment 2: Figurative Language versus Literal Language Language is used as the primary process to communicate with one another. There are many different forms of language, and the meaning can change depending on the situation used or way that it is worded. Two main forms of communication are figurative language and literal language. The former refers to a representation of something that may not actually be true but is either making a comparison or using different words to get a point across. The Merriam Webster dictionary defines figurative as “representing by a figure or resemblance” (“Figurative,” 2012). On the other hand, literal language is the complete opposite of figurative language because it means exactly what it says... out of...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...?Figurative Language versus Literal Language Figurative Language versus Literal Language Idioms An idiom is a word or phrase in a language or dialect that does not refer to the literal language. Idioms can be defined as a phrase or collection of words whose individual word dictionary meaning is different from what is written. A good example of an idiom is “John Kicked the bucket”. Literally, one would understand the statement that John probably kicked a real bucket but idiomatically, the phrase means that John died. The idiom is used to...
3 Pages(750 words)Assignment

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...?Figurative Language vs. Literal Language (Critical Thinking) The American language is a living, breathing, and ever evolving language. As such, it is composed of words, phrases, and sentences that find their origins in the most ancient of historical times with its meaning evolving over the years as people use the word for various purposes and to invoke various meanings. There can be figurative uses for the word, or even literal uses which manage to change the context of the word regardless of the word etymology. This paper will look into the etymology and meaning of 10 of the most...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...Figurative and Literal Language Literal language is used when an individual wants to make a blunt or obvious ment. When they want to color their words instead and make the recipient really consider what is being stated, the individual would rely on figurative language. However, figurative language can become a nuisance and even backfire if the individual does not know how to properly utilize these certain language devices. If they do not know how to use figurative language in the way that it was meant, it can lead to confusion on the part...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...Client’s 18 July English language is difficult and there is no denying that, the figurative language is even more difficult than normal English, this paper will shed more light upon the same. Idioms are widely used by many people but only a very few people know the exact meaning of the various idioms that are used by people. For instance only a very few people would know the meaning of hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, it means we must be nice to women otherwise we will have to suffer beyond our imagination. He walks with his nose in the air is another very popular idiom which not many would know about, it means a person who is supercilious and thinks very highly of himself....
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...Figurative Language versus Literal Language" "Figurative language versus literal language" In language, figurative language is inescapable. Figurative speech simply refers to the use and application of word in English to mean something else as opposed to the literal meaning. In this case, the intended audience has no option, but to uncover the intended meaning of the words or phrases used in a particular text. A lot of comparisons are made in the case of using figurative speech; thus, leading to an...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...Figurative Language versus Literal LanguageFigurative Language It is a matter of great expertise to use figurative language in such a way that it properly conveys a certain kind of meaning. It is quite easy for the reader or listener to misunderstand what is being said. This paper explains ten types of figurative language, along with a description of their usage. Idiom is a “multi-word lexeme” (Tschichold, 1995, par. 2), whose meaning is different from what the words actually mean. For example, “I’m broke” is an idiom which means that “I am out of cash”. It does not...
3 Pages(750 words)Assignment

Figurative language versus literal language

...Figurative Language versus Literal LanguageFigurative Language versus Literal Language Idiom An idiom is an interpretation of a blend of words that contain a metaphorical meaning. The metaphorical meaning is understood in relation to a widespread utilization of the illustration that is independent of the definition or literal meaning of the expressions of which it is constructed (Saeed, 2003). For example, ‘he is pulling my leg’. To pull a person’s leg denotes to taunt them by informing them something is not true. The appropriate circumstance would be when a person is expecting significant news. The example may be understood where a person takes things plainly. Analogy Analogy is an inference conveyed from one person... to...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Figurative Language versus Literal Language

...Figurative versus Literal Language Idiom An idiom is a phrase or group of words that has a meaning outside of and not concluded from the independentwords of the phrase. Idioms are not meant to be taken literally, but to paraphrase an action or event. An example of an idiom is sick as a dog. An appropriate circumstance to use this example is if someone is describing how incredibly sick they are. This phrase may lead to a misunderstanding if the speaker does not clarify that they are speaking about themselves and not a literal dog, or if the person being spoken to is unfamiliar with this particular idiom. Analogy An analogy is used to compare two things,...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Figurative Language vs. Literal Language for FREE!

Contact Us