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Resistance against Hitler and his Nazi Regime - Essay Example

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The essay entitled "Resistance against Hitler and his Nazi Regime" concerns the personality of Hitler and his Nazi Regime. Reportedly, the main aim of this paper is to critically analyze the resistance of the Germans against the Nazi regime under the leadership of Adolf Hitler. …
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Resistance against Hitler and his Nazi Regime
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Resistance against Hitler and his Nazi Regime

Download file to see previous pages... For instance at one time, the Nazi regime issued 35, 200 death sentences, and out of this number, 20,000 victims were communist adherents. Also, in 1941, approximately 405 people were put in custody for being either followers of communism or Marxism. The enabling act of 1993 gave Hitler a lot of power, and Hitler misused this power by establishing a concentration camp at Dachau to deal firmly with the enemies of the Nazi regime (Sax & Kuntz, 1973). The rebels were arrested and brutally punished in the concentration camp. Hitler also used his enormous power to empower the Gestapo police unit more, so as to deal with the Nazi regime critics. Resistance Groups Doris Berger Understanding of Resistance Before we look at the various anti-Nazi forces in Germany, let us look at the meaning of the term resistance as understood by the historian Doris Bergen. Doris Bergen views resistance as any act that portrays disagreement and discontent with the status quo. For instance in pages 203- 204 of Berger’s book, War and Genocide: A concise History of the Holocaust, Berger details how the Nazi regime dealt with the perceived resistance movements, especially the Jews, whom the Nazi administration saw as the main threat of the Nazi administration. Berger’s conception of resistance therefore is any act that portrays opposition to the established system or to the status quo. This view of resistance is actually in agreement with the conventional understanding of the term resistance. German Youth Resistance against the Nazi Regime The main critics of the Nazi administration were the German youth. And to deal with this challenge, the Nazi regime established a system to make the youth remain loyal to the...
Before we look at the various anti-Nazi forces in Germany, let us look at the meaning of the term resistance as understood by the historian Doris Bergen. Doris Bergen views resistance as any act that portrays disagreement and discontent with the status quo. For instance in pages 203- 204 of Berger’s book, War, and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust, Berger details how the Nazi regime dealt with the perceived resistance movements, especially the Jews, whom the Nazi administration saw as the main threat of the Nazi administration. Berger’s conception of resistance, therefore, is any act that portrays opposition to the established system or to the status quo. This view of resistance is actually in agreement with the conventional understanding of the term resistance.The main critics of the Nazi administration were the German youth. And to deal with this challenge, the Nazi regime established a system to make the youth remain loyal to the Nazi regime. The young men in Germany were supposed to be members of the Hitler youth movement and the girls were supposed to be members of the German Girls league movement. The youth movements limited the leisure time for the youth in an attempt to make them loyal to the Nazi regime (Rich, 1973).Notwithstanding these youth movements, some young people refused to be members of these movements and they continued with resisting the Nazi regime, some of the resistance youth groups that were formed included Edelweiss Pirates and the Swing group. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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