Nobody downloaded yet

Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
A Psychosocial Assessment of a Breast Cancer Patient The Case of Irene Introduction Every woman who has been diagnosed with breast cancer normally becomes anxious, depressed, and distraught. As stated by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the serious attributes of a breast cancer diagnosis will in a number of women qualify to the conditions of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as an “exposure to an extreme traumatic stressor” (Sadler-Gerhardt et al…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER98.1% of users find it useful
Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient"

Download file to see previous pages This paper carries out a psychosocial assessment of Irene’s case, a 51-year old female who is diagnosed with breast cancer. After identifying major psychosocial issues using Spade’s framework a treatment plan is formulated and discussed. Psychosocial Vital Signs Perception: Due to her age Irene may overestimate her current illness. According to the profile, she is already experiencing some levels of anxiety due to the absence of counselling. Perhaps due to the absence of her two children, and the limited support that her husband can give her, Irene perceives her health condition as life-threatening and something extremely depressing. Personality Style: Irene shows needs for protection and support. Yet she shows a degree of determination and optimism. She assures herself every now and then that she will be okay. But then relapses to depression when she thinks of her relationship with her husband after the surgery. She afterwards becomes bitter because of the thought that her husband will be disappointed of her and see her unattractive after the surgery. Irene displays efforts to hide or repress her emotions. Support: The current support that Irene has comes from her husband, whom she lives with, her surgeon, and her breast care nurse. Later on, after the surgery, Irene will be supported by a multidisciplinary team. Other possible sources of support are her children and other close relatives. Due to the constant support from her husband, Irene’s perception of her health condition erratically shifts from lack of concern to anxiety. Coping: Irene seems to be coping with her health illness by seeking for social support and controlling her emotions. Anxiety: Irene is experiencing four major anxieties. First is the thought that her husband will be dissatisfied of her after the surgery; second is the possibility of surgical failure; third is her belief that old age brings many infirmities; and fourth is the thought that due to her age she will be experiencing other illnesses aside from breast cancer. Cultural Issues: The diagnosis evidently affects Irene’s self-worth as a woman. She obviously adheres to the assumption that women’s breasts are marks of womanliness and beauty. Hence Irene seems to be having second thoughts about seeking treatment. Lifestyle Information: She currently lives with her husband .She works as a receptionist at a plumbing supply store. She is a non-smoker and drinks two glasses of wine each week. As shown in the profile, there seems to be no indication that Irene will develop breast cancer. Major issues risked by the current health event for Mike: Irene’s diagnosis has perhaps the same psychosocial effects on her as those of Mike. Mike, early on in the diagnosis, displays signs of distress and despair. Irene’s health condition may also lead to marital problems, severe financial or resource constraints, and family maladjustments. Based on Irene’s psychosocial vital signs, three major psychological needs are identified, which are (1) support for psychological distress, (2) appropriate coping strategies, (3) and psychosocial support for Irene’s husband and entire family. The psychosocial assessment identifies anxiety and despair as the most obvious ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient Essay”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/nursing/1430654-psychosocial-nursing-assessment
(Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient Essay)
https://studentshare.org/nursing/1430654-psychosocial-nursing-assessment.
“Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/nursing/1430654-psychosocial-nursing-assessment.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient

Breast Cancer

...carcinoma is originating from the the milk producing glands (lobules). There are several forms of this type of cancer (alveolar, solid, mixed etc.) and all of them have different prevalence’s, however in total this type of cancer accounts for only 5 to 10 % of all invasive breast cancers (Boughey et al. 2009). As we mentioned above classification of breast cancers is important in order to assess the most effective therapy, however other factors like cancer size, involvement of lymph nodes, metastases and other factors are also important in choosing the most appropriate treatment. This is why a staging of...
9 Pages(2250 words)Research Paper

Breast Cancer

...are comfortable and have a good quality of life. References Bonaldi-Moore, L. (2009). Educational program: The nurse role in educating postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Plastic Surgical Nursing, 29 (4), 212-219. British Medical Association. (2008). Illustrated medical dictionary. Dorling Kindersley. Clark, L., Holcombre, C., Hill, J., Downey, H., Fischer, J., Krespi, M. and Salmon, P. (2009). The Perception of support received from breast care nurses by depressed patients following a diagnosis of breast cancer. Oncology, 91, 43-45. Marcovitch, H. (2005). Black’s medical dictionary. 41st ed. London: A& C Black...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Breast Cancer

...estrogen replacement therapy, prolonged oral contraceptive use, low physical activity and any typical or atypical enlargement of the breast tissue (Russo & Russo2004). The diagnostic tools available to assess and confirm breast cancer include mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and needle biopsy. Mammography becomes more sensitive with increasing age as the breast tissue density is lesser. The ultrasound is on the other hand helpful in younger women with denser breast tissues. Needle biopsy is done to assess the histology of the breast tissue through fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC)...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Breast Cancer

...) especially those who had their first menstrual period before age twelve; 2) had their menopause at a later age than the normal; 3) gave birth at an older age (30 years old and above); 4) has a family history of breast cancer; 5) excess alcohol consumption; 6) prolonged exposure of breast tissue to radiation; 7) recent utilization of oral contraceptives; 8) had postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy; 9) obesity; and 10) mutation of the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 (Johnston et al, 2008). Diagnostic Tests After being diagnosed of breast cancer and before surgery or any other treatment is considered for the patient, an...
5 Pages(1250 words)Research Paper

Breast Cancer

...the ailment as well as the extent of anticipations along with awareness. Moreover, administering analgesics as per requirement, relieving anxiety and relaxing the patient, giving skin care to the affected areas, keeping a close vigil upon treatment related complexities such as vomiting and bleeding among others are crucial factors (American Cancer Society, 2012). Short-term Goals Short-term goals entail: Proper breast screening To educate the community Perform regular exercise Making proper assessment Long-term Goals Long-term goals include: To introduce strict rules and regulations regarding the abuse of alcohol To educate the people especially women regarding the...
3 Pages(750 words)Admission/Application Essay

Breast cancer

...that are determined by size and spread of the lump. (MedicineNet.com, 2013) When the lump spreads outside the breast area affecting neighboring muscles, it is referred as Stage 3 breast cancer, which is considered as treatable among the doctors. This stage has also been divided further into three sub-stages that are determined by the same two factors of size and spread of the tumor (Brown, Freeman, & Platt, 2006, pp. 21-24). The last stage is also known as metastatic cancer (Mansel, Fodstad, & Jiang, 2009, pp. 27-35) in which cancerous cells reach other parts and/or organs of the body. In today’s science, this stage is considered incurable; however,...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Breast Cancer

...Breast Cancer: Research Proposal Introduction Transcription, in its simplest conceptualization is the synthesis of Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) from a DNAtemplate (McClean, 1998). Whether it is prokaryotic or eukaryotic, it first undergoes the process of initiation where there is a binding of RNA polymerase to double-strand DNA; then the second process follows called elongation where there is a development of a short stretch of DNA which is mostly of a single-strand (McClean, 1998); the last stage is the termination stage where there is a recognition of the transcription termination sequence (McClean, 1998). The RNA polymerase needs other proteins in order to carry out the transcription process. Ensuring...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Breast Cancer

...Running head: BREAST CANCER SCREENING AND PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT Breast Cancer Screening and Physical Assessment / Course Date Total Number of Words: 827 Introduction The National Cancer Institute reported that approximately “182,460 women will be diagnosed with and 40,480 women will die of breast cancer in 2008. (National Cancer Institute, 2009a) Basically, the median age wherein breast cancer can be diagnosed is 61 years old whereas the median age wherein a breast cancer patient would die...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Breast cancer

...population). Over 70% of cases diagnosed occur in women aged 50 or older but those women aged 50-69 can reduce chances of dying by 30% if they opt to have a breast screen once every two years (www.bcig.org.au, 2009, p. 1). About 95% of all breast cancer cases occurred in women aged 40 or older but there is an observed decrease in women aged 80 and above (Reed & Audisio, 2009, p. 3). (Note: The yellow highlight (2 paragraphs) already total 299 words). Nursing Assessment and Background The human body’s lymphatic system is vast and complex, composed of the lymphoid tissues and lymphatic vessels that carry the white lymph fluid and is part of the immune and circulatory...
3 Pages(750 words)Assignment

Breast Cancer

...surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, biological therapy, and hormone therapy. All these treatments can be used together or individually. It depends on the diagnosis and stage of the cancer .Screening of breast cancer is done at the early stages but diagnosis happens at a later stage when someone has the symptoms as discussed above. Doctors must take into consideration the grade and stage of cancer, general health, and whether a patient has reached menopause. When it comes to surgery it depends on the type of cancer someone has, which is then followed by chemotherapy or biological treatment that also depends on the type of...
6 Pages(1500 words)Research Paper
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Psychological Assessment of Breast Cancer Patient for FREE!

Contact Us