StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
English speaking Australia, the United Kingdom, and North America are caught in a paradox as advertisers promote unhealthy eating habits that promote obesity, while the media uses unrealistically ideal body images to sell their products. The consumers of media and products are caught in the middle with an unhealthy body and a confused mind…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER95.1% of users find it useful
Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media"

Download file to see previous pages Women become over-zealous in their attempt to mirror the body image of the fashion models seen on television and in advertisements. The consumer is literally caught inside a media pinball machine as they are sold the latest 'fat-burger' and are left with a guilty conscious. Fashion, sports, entertainment, advertising, and society all conspire to push our ideal of the perfect body to an unobtainable position.
There has been a substantial amount of research concerning the media's unrealistic and stereotypical portrayal of the body image. While much of the research has taken place in the US, other Western cultures including Australia, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand, and the Netherlands have noted similar results and have found women "living with near constant exposure to narrowly defined and highly unrealistic beauty ideals".1 Television and print advertising are at the core of the drive to sustain a connection between the public and a structure that is acceptable to the members of an in-group. Verri et al. (1997) and Tiggermann (1996) found a direct correlation between the amount of, and the dependence upon, television viewing and the vulnerability to developing an eating disorder.2 In addition, Sanders et al. (1995) found a direct correlation between the numbers of magazines read by 12-year-old girls and the probability that they would consider themselves overweight.3 However, this phenomenon is not unique to females, as men also suffer from poor body image. Bergstrom and Neighbors state, "Body dissatisfaction among men is influenced by many of the same factors as that among women. Significant research has focused on various sociocultural influences on the male ideal body figure, which may contribute to body dissatisfaction" and an unrealistic obsession with muscularity.4 Likewise, the research has also shown that this problem is pervasive from a very young age on through adulthood. Children as young as six are affected by the stereotyping of ideal body image, as are the elderly, though the effect is mediated by older age.5, 6 The media's influence on body image begins early in childhood and continues through the later stages of life for both genders.
Most people are dissatisfied with some aspect of their body, and many people have a distorted view of it or an unrealistic evaluation. There are two types of body image distortions that lead to dissatisfaction. The first, known as body-size distortion, is a perception that is distorted where the individual "misperceives his or her body size, or the size of various body parts, as being larger than they objectively are".7 This distortion is often a precursor and a marker for the eating disorders of anorexia or bulimia. According to Bergstrom and Neighbors, "The second type of body image disturbance, termed body dissatisfaction, refers to the cognitive, affective, or attitudinal nature of negative body image".8 This dissatisfaction is more likely to lead to unhealthy dieting practices, extreme bodybuilding, or cosmetic surgery that may be unnecessary and have long lasting negative effects. Whether people have a distorted image or are simply dissatisfied with their body, the media fuels the problem and people are motivated to take actions that may have negative consequences.
This research will focus on the attention that the media places on a ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media Essay”, n.d.)
Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media Essay. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1505011-gender-stereotypes-in-the-australian-media
(Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media Essay)
Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media Essay. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1505011-gender-stereotypes-in-the-australian-media.
“Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1505011-gender-stereotypes-in-the-australian-media.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media

The Role of Mass Media in the Development of Aggression

Despite the fact that longitudinal studies have proven that human aggression is to some extent an unwavering trait, it is undeniable that the environment plays a big role in influence the aforementioned behavior (Slaby & Roedell, 1982). Our daily encounter with the environment is a form of socialization that is defined as the process of integrating within oneself a sense of connection to a larger social world by means of discovering, understanding and adopting the beliefs, values, and norms of culture of other people. To a certain extent, sociologists consider the mass media as a powerful socializing agent as its significance is not constrained to the content alone of the media messages. Instead, it affects how we learn a...
10 Pages(2500 words)Report

Stereotypes of Racial Discrimination and Violence

Media is largely responsible for influencing their viewers or listeners in a variety of ways. It could be as simple as the viewer changing his/her hairstyle to copy the exact look of a celebrity seen on television or in magazines, but for others, media can take over their lives and influence them to think differently. Although not a box-office hit, Crash was given good reviews by critics and the movie even managed to win the Best Picture Award in 2005 at the Oscars (Oscars.org, 2008), including two nominations for two Golden Globe Awards (Goldenglobes.org). This paper has analyzed the movie in the historical context, wherein it is discussed how different races have been perceived by different people for many years through the powe...
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper

Myths and Stereotypes on Womens Madness in Feminist Literature

The ultimate salvation and expression of a woman lie in providing mental support to the ever so creative man, they went on convincing young, aspiring young women. It was this background that prompted Sylvia Plath to create the character, Buddy Willard’s mother and, make her say the sentence, “what a man is is an arrow into the future and what a woman is is the place the arrow shoots off from…,” (Plath, 1972, p.58) in her novel, Bell Jar.

Anybody that refuses to conform to the norms and conventions of the society stands the risk of being branded mad. Madness is a revolt of the psyche against the social conditioning that every human being acquires from his or her surroundings. Esther goes mad prim...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

The Effect of Mass Media on Latinos' Self Image

The willful perversion of facts relating to the representation of Latinos in the U.S. media is disgraceful, inconsiderate and extremely misleading and hence calls for immediate attention to prevent the degradation of a particular section of the society since their depiction and imagery in mass media plays a significant role in shaping their social identity and governs their self-esteem. Television and films both being dominant forms of media persistently depict racial stereotypes which are largely false representations of the
According to U.S. Census (2000), Latinos are the fastest-growing ethnic communities in the United States constituting almost 12.5% of the population of which merely 3 – 4% of the Latino population...
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper

How Does the US Media Effects Evolve in Singapores Current Media

Lewis and Slade (2000, p. 223) in their critical evaluation of the effects of media communication on the audience argue that media effect is achieved incongruent with social context. Their study recounts the experiment on the influence of television on identity in Singapore indicates that US social values and Singaporean values greatly differ from each other. The sharp differences in program content have a negative influence on the audience because Chinese raised Singaporeans value marriage, social values, and collectivism whereas US social culture involves career, family and the struggle to balance the two. Therefore the question of US media's influence to destabilize Singaporean national identity is limited. This view is emphasi...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment

The Times and The Guardian as the Most Influenced Media

The broadsheets are probably the most famous to readers overseas. Media is one of the fastest-growing industries in the UK. And among them, a newspaper is one of the major media businesses in the UK. The media industry in the UK is expected to be ₤ 84 billion in 2010. In 1985, this industry was only ₤ 7 billion. (“UK Mediaphile 2010: UK media market could be worth £84 billion by 2010”, 2009) and in 50 percent of the media market was of print media, that is, mainly newspapers. However, the scenario has changed now, according to some study, it is expected that in 2010 only 16 percent of the whole media industry will comprise of newspaper or basically print media. A major chunk will move towards electronic media suc...
10 Pages(2500 words)Case Study

The Evolution of Public Media

To instigate one to a category can now just as easily break out into a full-on discussion that may exhaust time and brain cells and yet still remain undefined.
In so much so that censorship and other restrictions, imposed by governments, critiques, audiences and other artists may condone a certain message of restraint that could bring about a new sense or in some cases lack thereof of artistic freedom. It is no longer a matter of identifying the genre and then moving along with the idea. Today’s global world will continue to embark and expand to involve all who are part of this world to be within the grasp of criticism or acclaim.
This categorizing and boxing up is now becoming obsolete as more and more works show...
9 Pages(2250 words)Coursework

The Effects of Media to Its Audience

The effects of the media can be attributed to the interaction with the different components of society. Media refers to the components of communication in different forms. When a layman is asked regarding the definition of media, the different forms such as television, radio and internet are the main answers. Basically, these examples have the common denominator of being able to communicate with the target population or the audience (Cardwell 1-3).

In the process of effective communication, the effects that can be incurred to the audience can be explained on the basis of different views and aspects. Included in the said issues is the capability of the audience to intercept and understand the stimuli and signals that are...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

The Law and the Media

New and complex issues have arisen which demanded fresh understanding and handling of cases involved them. This has resulted in the enhanced development of specialized laws e.g. cyber laws and interpretation of those laws. The same is true with Media Laws. Media has developed much in the last half-century. As it evolved as a profession and more people started to join it, there arose the levels of money involved in it. With this grew the contractual obligations on the parts of parties and concerned laws e.g. patent laws, privacy laws, and copyrights laws, etc. also started to play their parts. With these issues, the role of law in the media industry also reached a new height.
Mathew Fisher, the appellant, joined a band with Mr...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment

Gender Roles in Childrens Books

Brott argues that a large percentage of the writers have mainly focused on male protagonists and the few that have touched on women’s issues do so from a negative point of view (Brott 23). Consequently, men’s reputation has been tarnished to a point where it is difficult to repair. Previous attempts to rectify the transgression have not resulted in significant outcomes for the oppressed gender.
In most societies, the most significant and effective method of passing on values and perceptions rests in reading and telling stories captured in children’s literature. An ordinary experience for many kindergarten children involves listening to stories told from books, most of which are enhanced with illustrations. T...
8 Pages(2000 words)Literature review
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Gender Stereotypes in the Australian Media for FREE!

Contact Us