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War Against Terror - Essay Example

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It is true that terrorism has created significant importance throughout the world especially in U.S.A and Britain, the global war on terrorism has created a social and political turmoil, it seems as if U.S.A Army is implementing the principal implications of a real war, rather than taking simple and effective measures to combat terrorism…
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War Against Terror
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Download file to see previous pages Whether the terror war is based on a series of structured brainstorming sessions that began shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, supplemented by selective research and updates (Ronczkowski, 2004, p. 2) or based on London bombings we are still struggling with defining, dealing with, and addressing terrorism and the roles of officials and agencies in combating terrorism. What have we gained so far Terrorism is there; War on terrorism is going on; we have not gained security against terrorism but a social and moral fear because of politics and legal concerns. Such concerns have emerged a new fear and panic within us.
On the other hand the field of terrorism in the context of research or military arenas has revealed that there is a lack of awareness, especially by law enforcement personnel, as to how to best deal with and analyse terrorism and terrorist-related activity. Therefore, how are we expecting law enforcement personnel to identify something about which they do not have a conceptual understanding Law enforcement academies have always focused on training and developing an individual so he understands every aspect of what he can do and what is expected of him in criminal-based situations locally, according to state guidelines. So how can law enforcement personnel be expected to effectively address the international reaches of terrorism without proper training and awareness of what they are attempting to identify and analyse Even it is found out that the information obtained from terrorism analysis is used in strategic planning for areas such as crime prevention and conflicts. However, is crime prevention the same as terrorism prevention
Such a war on terror is producing nothing but causing in the society intense fear, anxiety, apprehension, panic, dread, and horror. (Garaeu, 2004, p. 14) The main targets of terrorist compulsion are the civilian population, distinguishing these techniques from conventional acts of war directed primarily against military targets. Often members are selected and randomly attacked and escorted towards the preplanned violence that is directed against targets specified.
Terrorism often targets business corporations in the private sector. However the war on terror suggests measures to identify all the predictable and unpredictable impacts of terrorist influence upon its instant victims. The war against terror develops its intentions to fight and inspire anxiety, even among its' own members of the public which are far removed from its immediate surrounding area, as well as generating widespread moral disgust about the use of these techniques. The war on terror is often considered as a war which is aimed primarily at terrorists but accidentally military targets also suffer thereby inviting 'collateral damage' to occur, where many civilians are accidentally hurt, but this differs from violent acts that are intentionally directed against the general public. One cannot say how much such a war is beneficial for eradicating terrorists but this is for sure that such wars cause moral turmoil among the citizens. (Just et al, 2003, p. 7)
The number of US institutes and research centres and 'think thanks' which have now added this subject to their research agendas against 'war on terror' or, have been newly established to specialise in this field ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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