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WHY WE ABUSE OUR CHILDREN - Essay Example

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1.(introduction) The act of child abuse whether caused by neglect, physical harm, sexual abuse or mental torture enrages communities on an international scale. The figures of child abuse are not only alarming but also very often do not present the true measure of the amount of abuse that occurs in society and there are many cases going unnoticed or unreported…
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WHY WE ABUSE OUR CHILDREN
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Why We Abuse our Children introduction) The act of child abuse whether caused by neglect, physical harm, sexual abuse or mental torture enrages communities on an international scale. The figures of child abuse are not only alarming but also very often do not present the true measure of the amount of abuse that occurs in society and there are many cases going unnoticed or unreported. Many times, what makes an individual or group of people abuse children is often incomprehensible to the norm of society. All too often drug abuse, stress, the inability to cope with everyday isuues, lack of knowledge and sexual deviances is at the forefront of the stories discussed and highlighted in the media. In many instances, public outrage draws attention to the social system's lack of power to prevent and protect children, and the knock on effect that carries into adulthood. There are numberless domestic and international, institutional and social organizations that work toward the prevention of child abuse. Child abuse occurs as a result of broken homes, irresponsible parenting and stress due to financial circumstances. (thesis)
Broken home is a social phenomenon which directly can lead to child abuse. This usually occurs, because the couple separates and the signle parent has to take all the responsibility for upbrining the kids. When parents split, this results in decreasing of the income and the single parent is forced to work longer hours, has two jobs and do not spend enough time with his offspring. The lack of parent's presence, control, love and care makes the children to feel unwanted. Thus, they seek reassurance from external sources - such as gangs or street fights. When the single parent faces the fact that she /he can not handle the behavior of his kid in his emotional distress he uses aggression. In most of the cases the aggression has a physical form, transformed into child abuse.
The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2004) reported that parents dependent on or abusing alcohol are more likely to experience household turbulence than those who are not alcohol dependent. If one of the parents is alcohol-abusing or alcohol dependent this increases the probability to insult or yell at others, due to the incontrollable effect that alcohol has. Having serious arguments with children, a parent under the influence of alcohol or drug can easily lose his nerves and beat his children. In other words, there is a strong correlation between abusing alcohol and gruds and child abuse.

Child abuse is not uncommon if the family is under pressure from financial problems. This often happens because the family is living in crowded household, where three generations reside and there is large number of children. The stress accumulated by the financial circumstances makes parents to use harsh discipline in order to develop competitive skills in their children. However, this can go beyond the accepted boundaries and parents can end up battering their offspring. Loss of relative is another reason that can lead to child abusing. This occurs particularly if the children are moved to a kin relative. A number of grandparents and other relatives - aunts, uncles, cousins find themselves serving as parents for children whose parents died. Although, there is a blood relation between the caregiver and the kid, this does not necessarily guarantee "parental" care. The responsibilities of the kinship care are sometimes impossible to deal with, which can translate into neglect, and even include child abuse.
Conclusion: What thoughts are actually hidden in the hearts and minds of people who abuse children are difficult to comprehend. For example why pushed Melissa Huckaby, 28, Sunday school teacher to abuse, and eventually murder an innocent child as reported in California recently will remain a mystery. We may not discover the answers to all the questions concerning child abuse, however we can at least attempt to solve some of them. One thing that we can do is to report child abuse to the child welfare system if we notice suspicious bruises on the kid's body. Social welfare workers are required by law to ensure the safety, well-being and permanent living arrangements for such children. Addressing and reporting such cases will both make us responsible citizens and will provide the child with opportunity to receive the love and care he deserves.
References:
National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 13 February, 2004, retrived on 22 September 2009: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/nsduhLatest.htm Read More
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