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The First World War - Essay Example

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The paper "The First World War" states that the war ended with the defeat of the German and Austrian-Hungarian Empires against the British, American, and French. The Russians were forced out early from the war due to the rise of the Bolshevik communists. …
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The First World War was allegedly caused by the assassination of the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife by a Serbian nationalist radical by the name of Gavrilo Princip. This gave the Austro-Hungarian the pre-text to go to war with Serbia. In response, the Russian Empire went to the aid of Serbia since Russia looks to it as a fellow Slavic neighbor. This led the German Empire to take the side of its Austro-Hungarian neighbor. The British would also go to war in case Germany joined the Austro-Hungarian Empire, while the French would go to war with Germany in order to take revenge for the recent Franco-Prussian War. However, the concept of Empire and Imperialism were strong driving factors for the First World War. The great powers of Europe wanted to expand and maintain their spheres of influence in Europe. The rise of nationalistic sentiments among the different ethnic populations led to the strengthening of imperial influence. For instance, Russia supported Serbia since both belong to the Slavic people.
Being a foot soldier during this period of war can range from depressive to horrific. Since static trench warfare was the predominant strategy during this time, the soldiers on each side were either on the offensive or the defensive stance. Women took part in the war mainly as field medical aid or support units.
The Treaty of Versailles was passed to the humiliating detriment of both the German and Austro-Hungarian Empires. Both states lost their holdings and status as imperial powers, and their military capabilities reduced. The face of Europe changed after the First World War as the Balkan states that were under the Austro-Hungarian Empire became independent. Germany lost its imperial influence, while Russia became the Soviet Union after the communists took over the Tsarist rule. Read More
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