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Tourism and Indigenous Peoples - Case Study Example

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The significance and role played by tourism in fostering positive development, particularly among the indigenous communities, has been well documented by way of extensive research, carried out over the years (Altman, 1989; Hall & Weiler, 1992; Hinkson, 2003; Hollinshead, 1996;…
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Tourism and Indigenous Peoples
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Download file to see previous pages The significance and contribution of indigenous communities, thus indicates the value of indigenous culture in promoting the distinct and exotic cultural features which in turn may lead to the revival of the local culture (Ryan and Aicken, 2005 in Page, Connell, 2006). Indigenous tourism affords the indigenous communities to participate and reap the benefits that such tourism offers.
The key issues discussed as a part of this study include: the manner in which the participation of local indigenous communities can be increased and encouraged by way of training, management or effective strategies; the manner in which their cultural heritage can be promoted in a way that it helps in contributing in enriching Australias tourism experience; and in what way can the policies and strategies so developed, help the indigenous populations, in establishing safe, secure and sustainable futures in terms of increased business opportunities, activities and a greater understanding of the tourism industry in general.
The purpose of this report is to enhance or add to the existing market knowledge with regard to tourism as it pertains to indigenous people; help in establishing a cohesive long-term strategy aimed at developing indigenous tourism in Australia; establish a framework which allows for a greater understanding of the indigenous people, their culture, and lifestyles and in the process add to the knowledge and experience of the tourists. This study will help in understanding the manner in which strategies contribute in building the overall appeal of South Australia as a popular tourist destination, and in the process promoting indigenous tourism and cultural heritage of the region.
The Australian Aboriginal Cultures Gallery (AACG) is a part of the South Australian Museum, which offers its visitors a unique experience of the Aboriginal culture and the rich cultural heritage of South Australia, by way of collections of art and artifacts. It boasts of one of the world’s ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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