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God, Man, and Nature in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Book Report/Review Example

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God, man and nature are vastly intertwined with each other, and with the exception of God, each could not survive without the other.Man could not survive without nature; he depends upon the earth for his food, the rain for his water, the trees for his dwellings and the sun for his warmth.
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God, Man, and Nature in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
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"God, Man, and Nature in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley"

Download file to see previous pages Although works of fiction, “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley, both depict accounts of what can happen to a person or a society that attempts to become a godVictor Frankenstein, the protagonist of the novel “Frankenstein,” is a scientist who has made an amazing discovery—he can create life.
“After days and nights of incredible labour and fatigue, I succeeded in discovering the cause of generation and life; nay, more, I became myself capable of bestowing animation upon lifeless matter'.Frankenstein is both exulted and apprehensive about his discovery and unsure, at first, what to do with this knowledge.
“When I found so astonishing a power placed within my hands, I hesitated a long time concerning the manner in which I should employ it. Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labor.” ( Frankenstein pg. 50)Giddy of his own success, and filled with dreams of what the discovery could mean for him as a scientist and researcher, Frankenstein decides to create a human being, one that would worship him for developing him.“I doubted at first whether I should attempt the creation of a being like myself or one of simpler organization; but my imagination was too much exalted by my first success to permit me to doubt my ability to give life to an animal as complex and wonderful as man.” " ( Frankenstein pg. 50)
"No one can conceive the variety of feelings which bore me onwards, like a hurricane, in the first enthusiasm of success. Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world. A new specifies would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me. No father could father could claim the gratitude of his child so completely as I should deserve theirs." ( Frankenstein pg. 51)
So Frankenstein created his being, only to realize at its completion he had made a horrible mistake.
"The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature. I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bed-chamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep." ( Frankenstein pg. 56)
"Oh! No mortal could support the horror of that countenance. A mummy again endured with animation could not be so hideous as that wretch. I had gazed on him while unfinished; he was ugly then; but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion, it became such a thing as even Dante could not have conceived." (Frankenstein pg. 57)
Thus began Victor Frankenstein's descent into hell.
"I passed the night wretchedly. Sometimes my pulse beat so quickly and hardly, that I felt the palpitation of every artery; at others, I nearly sank to the ground through languor and extreme weakness. Mingled with this horror, I felt the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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