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The impact of the No Child Left Behind Law on Texas Schools - Research Paper Example

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The impact of the No Child Left Behind Law on Texas Schools Since the year of 2002 when the implementation of the No Child Left Behind law came into to effect, many changes have occurred in the classrooms of Texas school children. The way that teaching is carried out, and the testing procedures that students undertake, have affected the educational lives of students…
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The impact of the No Child Left Behind Law on Texas Schools
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The impact of the No Child Left Behind Law on Texas Schools Since the year of 2002 when the implementation of the No Child Left Behind law came intoto effect, many changes have occurred in the classrooms of Texas school children. The way that teaching is carried out, and the testing procedures that students undertake, have affected the educational lives of students. Teachers and school staff have also been affected. This law has changed the previous manner in which money was delegated for educational purposes. Whether or not the impact of this law has been positive or negative is a controversial subject. The law was intended to improve academic performance. Although there are some improvements in school and student performance ratings, there are many problems that have been created for certain groups of students and schools that are not able to meet the proposed levels of achievement for various reasons. Those who are in favor of the No Child Left Behind Law believe that the law offers a good manner in which to measure the achievement of a student through the use of standardized testing. They feel that the testing mechanisms allow students to learn the most essential information in certain areas including history, math and literacy. These subjects are deemed as being more useful as compared to subjects such as arts and music. Since the curriculum is the same across states, children are able to move more easily from one school to another and integrate easily into the same curriculum. The testing is able to help teachers realize where there are weaknesses in their students learning, and adjust their teaching to try to ensure improved performance. The law is believed to have checks and balances in place to make sure that schools which are falling below performance targets are given assessment and resource allocation to improve performance initiatives. These measures are intended to motivate teachers to produce a high quality of teaching. Those supporting the belief that the law has had a negative impact on schools, raises valid points about how serious some children are being affected by the law. Some feel that the usage of standardized testing is limiting the skill range that students are exposed to in order to be able to learn. As a full range of skills is not measured, it is impossible to get an accurate assessment of a student and a school’s overall true performance. The methods of testing are uniform, and not all children learn the same, therefore some children will automatically be at a disadvantage. The system is not able to track student performance on an individual basis, which is not useful in terms of specified results. Teachers may only focus on teaching particular subject matter as they know what will be tested for, therefore the students are not able receive the opportunity to learn many different subject areas from teachers. The art and music programs have declined in the schools as these areas are not required to be reported on by teachers. Students are supposed to learn in a very strict and rigid environment. Testing is almost creating a fear factor for all involved in the academic system, if certain grades are not achieved. The elements of fun and creativity have been taken out of the educational system. Teachers are more focused on a student who is in the middle of the success spectrum, the lowest achiever is left out and the highest achievers are left out; as the teachers do not have the time or incentives to spend with those students. Some students feel such intense testing pressure, that they are more likely to want to drop out and may also feel discouragement. There are so many possible benefits to having the current No Child Is Left Behind law and yet there are numerous problems. Every student and teacher who is involved with the educational system is under the effect of the law. Texas students are placing their educational lives in a system that could have quite a negative effect on their academic performance depending on the individual strengths and weaknesses of the student. The students who are at most risk for experiencing problems as a result of this law are the students who are not exceling. There seems to be an unfair disadvantage for students that learn a certain way, and have skills other than those that fall within the narrow definitions that are provided by this law. The future of learning for students in Texas Schools will be significantly impacted by the current No Child Left Behind law. References Center on Education Policy: Answering the Question That Matters Most: Has Student Achievement Increased Since No Child Left Behind? Washington: Center on Education Policy, June 2007. Haney, W. Evidence on Education under NCLB (and How Florida Boosted NAEP Scores and Reduced the Race Gap). Center for the Study of Testing, Evaluation and Education Policy. Lynch School of Education. Boston College, 2009. Pederson, P. What Is Measured Is Treasured: The Impact of the No Child Left Behind Act on Nonassessed Subjects. Clearing House, 80(6), 287–291.2007. Retrieved from Education Research Complete database. Read More
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