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Computer forensics: admissibility of evidence in criminal cases - Admission/Application Essay Example

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According to the Committee on DNA Technology in Forensic Science, forensic typing of blood has been common place for the last fifty years. However, the personal and sensitive information that DNA produces, requires strict…
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Computer forensics: admissibility of evidence in criminal cases
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Computer Forensics al Affiliation) Computer Forensics: Admissibility of Evidence in Criminal Cases. DNA Technology in Forensic Science (1992) Committee on DNA Technology in Forensic Science, Washington, DC, National Academies Press
Genetic profiling and databases are not a new concept. According to the Committee on DNA Technology in Forensic Science, forensic typing of blood has been common place for the last fifty years. However, the personal and sensitive information that DNA produces, requires strict confidentiality and security. The Committee also shows how databases have created an evolution in forensics. Before the invention of the Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS), fingerprints were compared by hand to only a handful of suspects. Now a latent print can be compared to millions of identified prints. While DNA is finding its place in forensics, the Committee on DNA Technology has its concerns. They conclude that there needs to be standardization to typing DNA. This would help in using the information correctly.
Breaking Forensics Software: Weaknesses in Critical Evidence Collection. (2007),
Newsham, T, Palmer, C, Stamos, A & Burns, J.
Newsham, Palmer, Stamos and Burns state that the use of forensic software is not without its faults. They assert that a breakdown in forensic software is a common occurrence and hence a common problem. They state that this breakdown causes troubles when it comes to the collection of information that is to be tendered as evidence. A forensic investigation can seriously be hampered by defaults that can exist in forensic software. They can cause the software, for instance, to crash prior to an investigator obtaining the required data. In addition to this, there is similarly a possibility of overflow of buffer or stack overflow bugs that could permit the execution of malicious codes on the machine of a forensic examiner. According to them, this situation results in weakness, in the collection of critical evidence to be used in court.
Werrett, J, D. (2000) The National DNA Database. Birmingham: UK.
Werrett asserts that database forensics puts into reality several ways to catch criminals. He states that the database forensic process that is often used, may involve several ways of getting hold of criminals. One of the methods that he has identified is the DNA testing process or operation. The last few years have witnessed the Forensic Science Service establish itself and put into operation a national DNA database. This operation is intended to catch criminals who get away after committing an offence. The database forensic operation, or process that is involved, entails testing some DNA samples of individuals who are suspected of committing various crimes. In addition, some samples are analyzed from the evidence that is obtained from the crime scenes. This evidence is sent to be analyzed so as to get the perpetrators of the offence. DNA samples of individuals, who are suspected, are tested to verify if they were involved in the commission of the offence for which they are suspected. This source is useful for any concerned person who suspects an individual has committed a crime. This is because their DNA samples are analyzed to prove the innocence or guilt of the suspect.
References
DNA Technology in Forensic Science (1992)
Committee on DNA Technology in Forensic Science
Washington, DC
National Academies Press
Breaking Forensics Software: Weaknesses in Critical Evidence Collection. (2007)
Newsham, T, Palmer, C, Stamos, A & Burns, J.
http://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-15/dc15-presentations/Palmer_and_Stamos/Whitepaper/dc-15-palmer_stamos-WP.pdf
Article Retrieved: April 12, 2012
Werrett, J, D. (2000) The National DNA Database. Birmingham: UK. Read More
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