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Restorative Justice - Essay Example

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No: Date: University: The Restorative Justice 1. What Restorative Justice processes are available to you to use as a tool in crime prevention as well as in the aftermath of crime or anti social behavior and who are they likely to benefit?…
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Restorative Justice
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Download file to see previous pages According to Sherman and Tyler, “To have a more effective strategy for dealing with the issue of public compliance we would benefit from being in the situation in which people have additional reason for obeying the law beyond their fear of being caught and punished for wrong doing” (Tyler 310). The day-by-day progression of wrong doings in the American Society compelled all stakeholders to address this alarming trend in a befitting manner. Besides punishments awarded to the offenders by the competent court of law in shape of fine, term imprisonment, life imprisonment and death penalty as the case may be, the rehabilitation centers role to make them useful citizens of the society cannot be denied (Tyler 310). The restorative justice system has the capacity and the capability to effectively deal with the social evils of the society and to inculcate confidence amongst the law-abiding citizens. According to French & Raven, “the legitimate authority is an authority regarded by people as entitled to have their decisions and rules accepted and followed by others” (Tyler 311). ...
ve justice to arrange meetings of the offenders with the victims to sort out the issue amicably by offering them compensation in lieu of the damages done to their assets. It can be a successful model for resolution of conflict and repairing of harm since people are losing confidence in the criminal justice system. According to Weber, “The roots of modern discussion of legitimacy are usually traced by the important writings of Weber on authority and dynamics of social authority (Tyler 311). 2. What safeguards, rights and systems of accountability would you need to consider when training and using facilitators in Restorative Justice processes set among prisoners and people who have been involved in armed conflicts? Following factors are to be taken into account while training the trainer for the Restorative Justice Process as described in the report of the Training and Accreditation Policy Development Group (2004, pp. 7): a) effective communication skills b) safe environment c) treat people fairly without discrimination on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, culture and crime committed d) maintain confidentiality e) ability to determine self knowledge, experience and confidence in handling specific cases f) work as a co-practitioner when need arises g) conduct initial risk assessment h) examine the responsibility for the harm i) pin point the risk of emotional and physical harm to participants j) willingness to engage respectfully k) opportunities for expression and exchange of feelings l) get the harm related needs met as far as it can m) guide practitioners for sharing personal information with regard to domestic violence n) communication skills, first language, culture, socio economic status, physique, age o) pre-defined roles of victim and offender inclusive of ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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