StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Treaty of lisbon and its implications - Dissertation Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The treaty of Lisbon and its implications Introduction In past five decades, from being a mere six-member body, the European Union (EU) has substantially expanded to represent its current form, which constitutes a 27-member organisation. This rapid increase in number of states joining the Union is attributed to various reasons that range from economic to security reasons, while some experts have presented varying standardised reports that try to account for the fast increase in number of EU member states.1 In order to increase the level of trust, cooperation and mutual understanding, within member-states, various treaties have been framed over the years for acquiring benefits within existing …
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER98.9% of users find it useful
Treaty of lisbon and its implications
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Treaty of lisbon and its implications"

Download file to see previous pages The 2004 and 2007 treaties led to a great deal of debates where many experts contended that they were created to form a joint European superpower, however, exponents of the treaties argued that they were aimed at merely creating a better scope for a larger EU in the 21st century.2 The Lisbon Treaty is considered as one the most significant moves towards achieving European integration in the past five to six decades, after the Treaty of Paris created the European Coal and Steel Community or ECSC (1951). Some of the other landmark moves towards achieving European integration includes joining of Ireland, UK and Denmark as member states of the European Council (1973), formation of the Single Market (1985), removal of internal borders as per the Maastricht Treaty (1992), monetary union and the establishment of euro (1999-2002) and further enlargement of European Council in 2004-2007 (more new member-states). The Lisbon Treaty is considered to be at a similar rank as the aforementioned landmarks in the history of EU, and is likely to be the last important modification as regards changes within the constitution of the EU for the next few decades.3 The 2004 Constitutional Treaty, which was ineffective, was criticised on the ground it was presumably a constitution, which was complex and unreadable and despite the changes in the Lisbon Treaty, some critics contend that it also constitutional in nature and even more difficult to read and understand than the Constitutional Treaty.4 A look at the Treaty of Lisbon shows that it is indeed a lengthy piece of document where the official published version comprising of Protocols and Declarations amount to 271 pages. The treaty claims to bring about many modifications to the EU, like improving it to make the Union more effective, conferring it with legal legitimacy and democracy, and making it more transparent and accountable. In this context, the paper will analyse the main reforms as brought in by the Lisbon treaty in order to comprehend its implications on the EU and the member states. The Lisbon treaty A look at the history of EU shows that it laden with sporadic incidents revealing a serious lack of unity between the members, diplomatic problems, persistent issue of missing deadlines and fixed targets.5 The critics have especially remarked on these negative aspects and EU’s failure to yield power within the arena of global or regional politics, and owing to this, the body is often referred to as a ‘soft power.’6 Even in the context of security issues, EU as a body is often perceived as being unstable, indecisive and in general highly ineffective.7 While a war between the EU member-states is unlikely, the organisation’s responses during war-like situations or civil crises in the neighbouring states, as regards ‘crisis management,’ has been largely unsuccessful, owing to which the EU is still viewed as a weak body, in the context of unity and integration between its member-states.8 The representatives from the 27 EU member ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Treaty of lisbon and its implications Dissertation”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/law/1398181-treaty-of-lisbon-and-its-implications
(Treaty of Lisbon and Its Implications Dissertation)
https://studentshare.org/law/1398181-treaty-of-lisbon-and-its-implications.
“Treaty of Lisbon and Its Implications Dissertation”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/law/1398181-treaty-of-lisbon-and-its-implications.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Treaty of lisbon and its implications

Freedom Summer of 1964 and Its Relationship with the Civil Rights Movement

The other organizations which participated in this Registration campaign were the Council of Federated Organization (COFO) in league with the National Association for Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the Southern Christian Leadership Confederation (SCLC) and the Students Non-Violent Coordination Committee (SNCC). During this campaign, large groups of African American people, supported by around 1000 white volunteers, braved the rains in order to enter the Forrest Country Courthouse to register their Voting Rights. Around 30 Summer schools were also established during this Freedom Summer Campaign in various parts of Mississippi town in order to educate the black minorities, since, due t...
11 Pages(2750 words)Case Study

The Importance of the 1957 Rome Treaty

Because the European Union became real after the Treaty of Rome was signed, the specific Treaty is regarded as having fundamental importance for the development of all the countries that participate in the European Union. From another point of view, Fischer (2000, 37) noticed that “EU is a legitimate customs union, with minimal internal barriers and a common external tariff; it is not uncommon for it to use standards or subsidies to protect or aid its own products and to exclude foreign products’. In other words, the main characteristic of the European Union is its integrity which can be translated as a common effort for financial, technological, legal and social development. Of course, there are cases where the power...
10 Pages(2500 words)Assignment

Cognitive Psychology And Its Implications

Cognitive psychology attempts to understand the nature of human intelligence and how people think. The study of cognitive psychology is motivated by scientific curiosity, by the desire for practical applications, and by the need to provide a foundation for other fields of social science. (Anderson, 1990:3) Looking into the history of the world at large, it becomes evident that almost all human societies have been socially stratified from the most primitive Paleolithic and Neolithic ages to the most modern contemporary era of hi-technology and computerization. The social division of individuals is on the basis of caste, class, creed, clan, community, region, race, religion, gender, age, and socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic statu...
10 Pages(2500 words)Case Study

The Implications of International M&A

When an international merger or acquisition occurs when the company’s productivity improves through learning from partner firms or obtaining benefits from partners’ complementary assets. On the other hand, international M&A requires companies to restructure so that there could be overheads of coordinating corporate culture and the working environment.
In addition, even if there are no profits from international M&A, corporate managers might have a motivation to get hold of other companies if they have ambitions like “empire building” (Jensen (1986)). In these cases, a productivity loss may be found. Theoretically, it is difficult to determine whether productivity profits from international M&am...
11 Pages(2750 words)Assignment

Globalization and Its Health Impact in South Korea

It depended on the size of the country, the international specialization of the economy, the availability and distribution of assets, its human capital and infrastructure and the quality of a nation’s domestic policies (Cornia, 2001). According to Kwon (2002), Korea has neglected health and social development contrary to industrialized and mature welfare states. 

Globalization is a product of the interaction of technology, culture, and economics, which leads to compression of time, space and cognition (Labonte & Schrecker, 2006). It is the philosophy of One World where geographical boundaries become a blur. Korea was among the ten countries that responded to the economic crisis that led them to rely on lo...
6 Pages(1500 words)Term Paper

The Work Breakdown Structure and its Advantages in Project Planning

A typical construction project involves a WBS that evolves from an initial task that is successively subdivided into smaller work blocks until the lowest level is reached, indicating a tree-like structure. Subdividing the project breaks down the project work effort into packages that are both manageable and independent. It connotes that the lowest level of the package corresponds to the smallest project work, which requires the shortest completion time periods. As WBS shows the relationship of all elements of a project, a sound basis for cost and schedule control is provided.

Some lists of project activities involved in WBS include budgeting, cost allocation, time allocation and management, and quality assurance. These...
11 Pages(2750 words)Report

Liberalism and Its Aspects

After listing out the shades of liberalist thinking, the main point of this paper is that for the times that we live in, Liberalism is best suited as an alternative to the prevailing ideologies of the time. The world took a dangerous turn in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks on the US. The resulting “War on Terror” that followed took a toll on individual liberties and it appears to be that liberal values and liberalism have been buried in the rancor that characterized the last eight years. The very nature of the individual and his or her role in the nation-state has been tested and the notion of liberties questioned. However, there seems to be a tendency towards reclaiming the premises of liberalism namely that of indi...
12 Pages(3000 words)Coursework

Its a Wonderful Life and The Third Man: Messages in Film

The film It’s a Wonderful Life is 1946, World War II, a film by director Frank Capra, starring a beloved American actor, Jimmy Stewart. The film is intended to inspire hope, which might have been sorely lacking in World War II America. The themes of hope, faith, and goodwill are prevalent. Faith is prominent, in that, an angel is sent to guide an earthly human, George Bailey, in his life during a time when the world around him seems to be falling apart. The film begins by establishing the fact that a heavenly hand is needed in the life of the main character, George Bailey (Gehring, Wes, 1988, 135). The segue then is to the young George Bailey, so that the angel, and the audience, can understand who George Bailey is as an adu...
11 Pages(2750 words)Movie Review

Implications for Personal Investment

The assumption of perfect rationality can be rebutted by the fact that rationality is not the sole driver of human behaviour. On the contrary, our behaviour is contingent upon emotions such as love, fear, pain, and pleasure etc. Human beings only use their intellectual power to achieve or avoid these emotional outcomes (Pompian 2006). Secondly, the assumption of self-interested is also not deemed to be practical because many sociological studies have shown that people are not always self-interested. Had this been the case, then there would not have been a single philanthropist in the world, even people would have avoided negative behaviour such as suicide and alcoholism. The final assumption of perfect information also does not ho...
6 Pages(1500 words)Coursework

The Implications of Racism

The situation was so bad that people imported brides from their country just to avoid coupling the local people (Goldberg, 53). This is not a unique case. Though it is not documented, the social structure limits interactions between people from different races. For example, people still prefer to marry form their race. There are suggestions that the phenomenon is an aspect of culture and it is subconscious. Nevertheless, it contributes to creating disparities in society.
For example, France is one of the biggest settlements for Blacks and Jews in Europe (Goldberg, 76). These people settled there due to historical foreign policies adopted. For example, when France was a colonial power, she adopted the policy of assimilation. T...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Dissertation on topic Treaty of lisbon and its implications for FREE!

Contact Us