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Causes and Consequences of the Second Great Wave Immigration to the US - Research Paper Example

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The present study “Causes and Consequences of “the Second Great Wave” Immigration to the US” would focus on the 25 million Europeans’ trek. A thereat mass influx of immigrants was needed and welcomed. But later the new homeland and her stepchildren felt the consequences of this resettlement…
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Causes and Consequences of the Second Great Wave Immigration to the US
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Download file to see previous pages From 1890 to 1918, the country grew by a larger percentage than at any other 30 year period before or since.  The Eastern European immigrants flocked to the new industrial jobs in the city which filled an economic need in America.  On the other hand, their presence also instigated a cultural divide between the current resident small-town Protestant farmers and the new Catholic immigrants with the thick accents who were not ‘men of the land’ but rather had succumbed to the sinful life of the city. (Crossen, 2006).   Prior to 1890, the majority of the voting public was considered within the boundaries of the social middle-class.  By 1918, the country had become more socially divided.  “The massive influx of immigrants warped America’s historically middle-class character and created vast urban slums and a European-style antagonism between rich, fattened on cheap labor, and poor.” (Locke, 2002).  The rapid growth of the immigrant population became a threat to the country’s natural resources when there had been plenty for all.  The expansion of people and settlements along with over-hunting led to the creation of federal preservation programs such as the federal parks.
During the turn of the 20th century, the fear of immigrants reached a fever pitch. The roots of this new racism were from ‘old world’ anti-Catholic and anti-Semitic mind-sets. The ideology that grew from immigrant racism is the belief that the Western and Northern European Anglo-Saxon heritage was a superior ‘race’ to Eastern and Southern Europeans. (Higham, 1988).  These widespread beliefs had an effect on immigration policy in the U.S. which, in the early 1900’s, moved to limit the numbers and types of people allowed to immigrate.  The anti-foreigner sentiment crossed all segments of society, from the Protestant farmers in the furthest reaches of the rural regions to Ivy League elitists.  A Harvard-educated man formed the Immigration Restriction League in 1894 which made recommendations to the government.  ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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