Free

The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States ) - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
It is believed that the Hawaiian Revolution was staged by a group of wealthy American businessmen, coupled with few of the American sugar planters that were in the region. The aim of the coup against the monarchy was to set a constitution that would give this group of…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER95.6% of users find it useful
The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States )
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States )"

The Hawaiian Revolution It is believed that the Hawaiian Revolution was staged by a group of wealthy American businessmen, coupled with few of the American sugar planters that were in the region. The aim of the coup against the monarchy was to set a constitution that would give this group of individuals all the power they had to control the island, and at the same time, restrict and prohibit the power of Asians and native Hawaiians from all voting proceedings. The constitution that was drafted, aiming to reduce the power of the king by giving more power to the cabinet and legislature, which was controlled by the wealthy class of Americans (Lightner 58). This paper will look at some of the events that led to the Hawaiian Revolution, and what the revolution meant to the people of Hawaii during that period.
Being a monarchial state, Hawaii was ruled by a royal family, which ensured the safety and protection of the land. The king, David Kalakaua, got his authority from the people of Hawaii after successfully managing to reduce the power of the missionaries in the region. He ruled but was unsuccessful in completely eliminating the foreign powers in Hawaii, who would later turn against him. This led to the drafting of a new constitution that would limit his authority (Lightner 67). After the death of the king, Liliuokalani, his sister, succeeded him in 1891 and she refused to recognize the constitution in place opting to bring forth another that would give the native Hawaiians the right to vote and restore power to the monarch.
It was at this point that the wealthy American class in Hawaii chose to establish the 13-member committee, which would ensure that the queen was overthrown for her treachery against the constitution. The coup took place on January 17, 1893 after the shooting and wounding of a police officer who tried to cease armament meant for the committee. In order to avert violence in the region, the queen opted to surrender peacefully after her palace was surrounded by the committee’s militia. It was at this point that the committee put in place a government that would rule the region and had a president who was given the authority to rule over the dominion. In 1895, however, a group of Hawaiian loyalists who believed in the old ways and traditions started their own coup, but failed in securing the region back to its rightful owners (Fritz 59).
In some history books, this has been identified as the counter-revolution, which was brief and the lack of casualties makes it largely forgotten by most people. After its failure, the queen was arrested by the government headed by committee member Sanford B. Dole, and charged with treason. The monarchy was dissolved by the queen while she was under house arrest. At the time of all these operations and activities, Hawaii was recognized as a United States protectorate, and when Dole submitted a treaty that was to see Hawaii annexed, most people were opposed to the idea. In 1898, however, there was need to annex Hawaii after the strategic use of a naval base in Pearl Harbor proved to be of use for the Americans. In 1959, Hawaii became recognized as the 50th state of the United States of America. An apology was issued in 1993 by the American government over its role in the revolution that led to the dissolution of the monarchy in Hawaii (Fritz 73).
Works Cited
Fritz, A. William. The Hawaiian revolution: Tomorrow is too late. New York: American Printing Press, 2011. Print.
Lightner, Richard. Hawaiian History: An Annotated Bibliography. Oxford: Oxford University, 2004. Print. Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States ) Essay”, n.d.)
The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States ) Essay. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/history/1643019-the-hawaiian-revolution-history-of-the-united-states
(The Hawaiian Revolution ( History of the United States ) Essay)
The Hawaiian Revolution ( History of the United States ) Essay. https://studentshare.org/history/1643019-the-hawaiian-revolution-history-of-the-united-states.
“The Hawaiian Revolution ( History of the United States ) Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/history/1643019-the-hawaiian-revolution-history-of-the-united-states.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States )

United States History, Reagan Revolution through President Obama

...?United s History, Reagan Revolution through President Obama Since the proclamation, of America independence and period after the civil war there has as been tremendous changes in America history. Most of these events have been described as a significant turning point in America history, and they managed to change America in one way or another permanently. The America societies have been transformed by these events. Even today, major historical turning points still occur in America. In the period between Reagan and Obama administration, there have been various historical turning points. This took place in the last period of 19th century and continued in the first decade of 21st century. During the Reagan, administration the most... , and less...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

United States history film

...?United s History Film Review Assignment Summary The film To Kill a Mockingbird by Robert Mulligan was released in 1962. The film’s running timeis 128 minutes, and the same is distributed by Universal Pictures. Besides, Robert Mulligan and Alan J. Pakula are the producers of the film. The mastermind behind the film’s screenplay is Horton Foote. The main actors in the film include: Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, and Phillip Alford. The film’s plot revolves around the topic of racism in the southern states in USA. To be specific, the film attaches great importance to the problem of racism, segregation and prejudice faced by the African-Americans. In addition, the plot develops through the viewpoint of two main characters, Scout and Jem... in the...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

United States History

... United s History Trace the development of Spain New World Empire and explain why the Spanish conquistadores were able to conquer large portions of the America.  For 350 years, Spain ruled the vast empire the Spanish conquistadors had established. Queen Isabella of Spain supported Christopher Columbus, a Genoese explorer in his quest to explore the world. He arrived in Bahamas and made voyages to the new world before dying in 1506. This opened way for more explorers that are Spanish. The Spanish conquistadors conquered large empires in the New World. The Spanish colonizers had superior military technology and advanced military tactics that enabled them to form alliances with local tribes and carry out surprising attacks to conquer... ....
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

United States history

...United s History: Although We Think of Democracy as America's Key Feature, Capitalism has Played a Much Greater Role in Defining American Foreign Policy Since 1865 2007 United States History: Although We Think of Democracy as America's Key Feature, Capitalism has Played a Much Greater Role in Defining American Foreign Policy Since 1865 The issue of democracy in America in general is one which has been debated on and about for ages, and the matter of whether or not capitalism has played a larger role in the defining of American foreign policy when compared to democracy is one which is incredibly significant and relevant...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

History - United States History 1865

...in international affairs steadily grew. Friendly relations with Japan and trade with China was increased to the point when Open Door Policy 1899 was presented as a means of keeping China's trade open to all comers. Later U.S, along with Britain, Germany, France, and Japan entered into a world-wide race for power. Viewed in the long perspective, the Spanish American War was but one incident in a series of events which marked this arrival of United States as a world power. 2. Discuss the causes of the Industrial Revolution from 1865-1895. Be specific in explaining how each point you make affected the economy. The years between 1865 and 1895 mark the transition from an old to a modern...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

United States History

...United s History The purpose of this paper is to discuss four distinct topics related to American history and American political history. The format that this paper will utilize is to first identify the question then spend one page answering each of the four questions. Q#1) Discuss Pres. Johnsons great Society program. What were some of the successes? What were some of the failures? A#1) The Great Society was a set of programs with two ultimate goals related to the poverty reduction initiatives and addressing racial injustice. Ultimately the goal was to create a great society that aimed at eliminating the troubles of the poor and racially marginalized peoples. In relation...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

United States History

...United s History Out of all of the events that marked the twentieth century, World War II and the Holocaust stand out the most. While America may not have been feeling the same effects that the prejudice-driven Holocaust countries had been, we still faced the war that went along with it, and later the aftermath of the Holocaust, which effected us like any other. Furthermore, the events of those horrific years marred not only the countries overseas, but our own country as well. Even though the United States played a more passive role during the Holocaust years, we were still involved in the era as much as Germany had been. World War II had already been underway when the...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

United States History

.... Charters were given to different states and they defined the relationship between the parent country and the colony without any direct involvement. The whole governance, with the exception of a few things was based on these colonial charters. These charters were also responsible for great historical developments. These include the revolutionary era in which some of the terms of the charter actually increased fuel to the fire. Also during the latter part of the seventeenth century, these charters were considered as an unnecessary hindrance and were put to an end only to be replaced by royal provinces. 2) What beliefs and ideas that Americans often take for granted today were in their infancy in colonial Massachusetts?...
2 Pages(500 words)Assignment

History of united states

..., they showed bravery and fought relentlessly to achieve freedom for the country’s benefit. The civil war remains one of a kind as the soldiers fought out of will to liberate America (Moriarty 90). Work cited Akers, Charles W. Abigail Adams: An American Woman. New York: Pearson Longman, 2006. Print. Ayers, Edward L, and Edward L. Ayers. American Passages. Boston, MA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, 2012. Print. Blatt, Martin H, Thomas J. Brown, Donald Yacovone, and Colin L. Powell. Hope & Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Regiment. Amherst, Mass: University of Massachusetts Press, 2009. Print. Blight, David W. A People and a Nation: A History of the United States....
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay

United States History

...United s History In the year 1600 in New Mexico and Arizona, the members of Franciscan order belonging from the Spanish settlement present in Mexico, established their mission in the areas of the Hopi Indian tribe. San Bernardino which is considered to be the first permanent mission was established at Awatobi in the year 1629. In the year 1607, after spending five months at the sea, three ships that were being led by Captain Christopher Newport reached the Cape Henry which is present on Virginia Coast. The Godspeed, the Susan Constant and the Discovery later moved to James River which led them to Jamestown Island. Jamestown later became the first English settlement in United...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic The Hawaiian revolution ( History of the United States ) for FREE!

Contact Us