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What were the major historical causes for the successive waves of Greek colonization In what ways did Greek colonies impact Greek political institutions and cultural values - Essay Example

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The following discussion will be concentric upon the way in which the early Greek colonies came to be shaped and the overall level of acculturation that was exhibited within them. As with any level of colonization, the first major historical wave of Greek colonization that…
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What were the major historical causes for the successive waves of Greek colonization In what ways did Greek colonies impact Greek political institutions and cultural values
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The following discussion will be concentric upon the way in which the early Greek colonies came to be shaped and the overall level of acculturation that was exhibited within them. As with any level of colonization, the first major historical wave of Greek colonization that spread throughout the Mediterranean was primarily precipitated by a rapid increase in the overall level of trade, societal development, and interaction with the outside world. As Greeks came to realize that the regions around them were vulnerable and exhibited something of a power vacuum, Greek colonization was utilized as a means of taking advantage of this particular opportunity. Moreover, years of military expertise and familiarity with defending the Greek Speaking world from a host of foreign threats came to integrate deeply within an understanding of Greece and its role throughout the region. As can be seen from the situation that is been described, there was not merely one or two factors that encourage to Greece to colonize and otherwise invade the surrounding regions. Instead, a litany of factors coalesced and encouraged the nascent state, as a direct result of its exposure, trade, and subsequent military conquest, that colonization would be an effective means through which a greater level of wealth and regional influence could be exhibited.
After the conquest of the first wave of Greek colonization, it became clear that a level of administrative authority, unlike what existed within the Greek states, must be exerted as a means of ensuring that a level of separatism and possible/potential rebellion was not exhibited. Due to the fact that the individuals who were colonized were inherently “non-Greek” the colonies could not be expected to be administered willingly in the same way that free men within the Greek city states existed. As such, a new form of administration and one that promoted a level of Greek culture, identification, and governance was established within these newly conquered realms. Although it was not a primary interest of the Greek colonizers to instill a level of cultural respect, the institutions and governance structure that was established effectively created a level of Greek culture and respect for it within the institutions that have thus far been described.
As with any empire throughout the course of history, the growth and diversity of colonies created a situation in which Greece was forced to expend a great deal of energy, time, and money as a means of administering and ensuring that these colonies continue to function efficiently. Ultimately, what has been described with respect to Greek colonization and the manner through which culture was represented within this process is not something that can or should be understood in terms of a definitive and planned effort by the Greeks to engage non-Greeks with respect and cultural level of change. Instead, as a result of the time, energy, and money that was necessitated to ensure that these colonies remained firmly under the control of Greece, a level of cultural accommodation was a necessary component that came to be noted. Read More
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