1. What is Marx and Engels's view of the worker and his condition and how does the context of their writing (Industrial Revolution, post-French Revolution) influence this view (Chapters 19 and 20 can be used to discuss the context) - Essay Example

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This is so because work is as old as time. Among such theoreticians who developed an interest in the study of the worker and his condition are Marx and Engels…
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1. What is Marx and Engelss view of the worker and his condition and how does the context of their writing (Industrial Revolution, post-French Revolution) influence this view (Chapters 19 and 20 can be used to discuss the context)
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Download file to see previous pages cerning the worker and his condition and how the context of their writing of the industrial revolution in Post-French revolution influences their views. The paper will also discuss whether Marx and Engels view bourgeois revolution either positively or negatively.
Marx and Engel’s views with regard to workers and their condition is based the theory of alienation. The theory suggests that “in the modern industrial production under capitalist conditions, workers will inevitably lose control over their lives by losing control over their work”. For this reason, Marx and Engels imply that workers cease to become independent beings in any sense. For instance, they suggest that in a pre-capitalist condition a cobbler or a blacksmith would own his own shop, set his own hours and determine his individual working conditions, determine his product configuration and have a say on how his product is sold in the market (Max, Karl & Engels Friedrich 5). This implies that a workers relationship with people whom he worked and interacted with had very little influence with regard to personal character.
Marx, Engels and Gasper (157) uses materialistic concepts of history in an attempt to explain many significant events and developments that occurred in France. They note that after the French revolution, which culminated to the defeat in 1848, Napoleon the chief commander seized power and declared himself emperor Napoleon III. In this, Marx does not see historical revolution of the French bourgeois as a deterministic process (Marx, Engels and Gasper 157). They argue that men who make their own history, do not make it in the manner they please, or under circumstances chosen by them, instead they make their history under certain circumstances inherited or encountered in the past. After the defeat of Napoleon III in 1871, workers ceased power and control of Paris for two months (Marx, Engels and Gasper 165). This point brings into focus alienation as one of the causes of the Post ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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