Nobody downloaded yet

History of the Japanese in North America - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The history of Japanese Americans begins in the late nineteenth century when the first Japanese and Okinawan immigrants unload in Honolulu Harbor as indentured laborers of the many sugarcane and pineapple plantations. This event leads to several phases of Japanese American history: anti-alien period of the west coast in the early twentieth century, internment period during World War II, and finally political empowerment period of the late 1960s leading into the present day…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER96.7% of users find it useful
History of the Japanese in North America
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
"History of the Japanese in North America"

Download file to see previous pages People from Japan began migrating to the U.S. in significant numbers following the political, cultural, and social changes stemming from the 1868 Meiji Restoration. Particularly after the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Japanese immigrants were sought by industrialists to replace the Chinese immigrants. In 1907, the "Gentlemen's Agreement" between the governments of Japan and the U.S. ended immigration of Japanese workers (i.e., men), but permitted the immigration of spouses of Japanese immigrants already in the U.S. The Immigration Act of 1924 banned the immigration of all but a token few Japanese.
The ban on immigration produced unusually well-defined generational groups within the Japanese American community. Initially, there was an immigrant generation, the Issei, and their U.S.-born children, the Nisei. The Issei were exclusively those who had immigrated before 1924. Because no new immigrants were permitted, all Japanese Americans born after 1924 were--by definition--born in the U.S. This generation, the Nisei, became a distinct cohort from the Issei generation in terms of age, citizenship, and language ability, in addition to the usual generational differences. Institutional and interpersonal racism led many of the Nisei to marry other Nisei, resulting in a third distinct generation of Japanese Americans, the Sansei. Significant Japanese immigration did not occur until the Immigration Act of 1965 ended 40 years of bans against immigration from Japan and other countries.
The Naturalization Act of 1790 restricted naturalized U.S. citizenship to "free white persons," which excluded the Issei from citizenship. As a result, the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“History of the Japanese in North America Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words”, n.d.)
History of the Japanese in North America Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/history/1532657-history-of-the-japanese-in-north-america
(History of the Japanese in North America Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 Words)
History of the Japanese in North America Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 Words. https://studentshare.org/history/1532657-history-of-the-japanese-in-north-america.
“History of the Japanese in North America Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/history/1532657-history-of-the-japanese-in-north-america.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
Japanese America
...to gather their belongings. In addition, several people took advantage of that as the citizens were required short sell their possessions. At the time of World War II, Americans drastically feared attacks from foreign enemies. The attack on Pearl Harbor was just another incident that “fueled the fire.” Hence, for many Americans, detaining Japanese Americans and throwing them into camps seemed justifiable. Ironically enough, history has a strange way of repeating itself. After the attacks in September 11, many Muslims faced a similar situation as many were deported, arrested, and tried for crimes they did not commit. Obviously, my view is different since the modern society is propagating for civil rights....
1 Pages(250 words)Coursework
North America Geography
...(physiography and landforms); and, biogeography (fauna and flora). The surface physiography of any region draws huge influences by the underlying rock structure. Geologic evidence demonstrates that, from 200 million years, the continent of North America altered its course and started drifting away from Pangaea. The earliest recorded history of any civilization dates back 5,000 years ago (Meinig, 1989). The physical features of North America entail Northern section of the American Cordillera comprising of the geologically new Rocky Mountains (located in the west) and older Appalachian Mountains to the east. The North features several...
10 Pages(2500 words)Research Paper
Japanese Cars in America
...Why Do Americans Prefer Japanese Cars WHY DO AMERICANS PREFER JAPANESE CARS GRACE SARKAR Order No. 347533 16 December 2009 WHY DO AMERICANS PREFER JAPANESE CARS Purpose of Research Exercise The purpose of this research is to find out why Americans prefer Japanese cars Type of Research This is an exploratory research. I am trying to solve the problem by exploring the reasons behind the purpose. Target Market The target market is the young people based in the United States of America who are just beginning to build brand loyalties (Americans Still Think Japanese Cars Best, 2007). Sample Size Sample size surveyed is...
3 Pages(750 words)Research Paper
North America
...North America It is impossible for people living today to truly understand what North America looked like during the age of discovery. While we can gain some understanding by exploring the limited remaining wild places and studying some of the history of geographical regions and historical events, it must always be remembered that history is often told through the eye of the victor. A cursory understanding of history indicates that the European explorers arriving on the ‘pristine’ shores of North America found an abundant land filled with often unreasonably savage tribes of Indians who...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Caribbeanization of North America
...CARIBBEANIZATION OF NORTH AMERICA The term Caribbeanization refers to the large scale Caribbean migration in the United s and the resultant impact / influence on the American culture and society. This report discusses the adaptation and settling in of the Caribbeans, their geo-political and economic role / contribution, and seeks to understand the subsequent transformation of the United States following the Caribbean migration. Haiti, one of the oldest black republics in the world, is located in the West Indies between Cuba and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea. A large number of Haitians fled to the United States during the eighteenth and nineteenth century following political unrest in the mid 1790s,...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Japanese History
...Japanese History and its influences The history of a country maximally differs from the history of other nations in various aspects. But if there isinteraction among the people belonging to different countries, there are chances that the one nation’s history may be influenced by other nation or nations. One nation’s history which has been influenced by the history and activities of other nation is Japan. Japanese history and its culture has been largely influenced by the Chinese history and culture since ancient times. In this paper, we will analyze the Chinese influence...
2 Pages(500 words)Research Paper
North America Immigration
...Mexican immigration to USA The Mexican immigration to North America started long back in 1850. Over the period 1850 to 1880 around 50000 Mexicans came to North America as migrant workers to work in building railroads. Their destination was California, Arizona, Nevada and Utah; all were primarily Mexican territories that were surrendered to USA following the Treaty of Gaudalupe (1848). (Head) Texas and Illinois soon became popular destination for Mexican Immigrants. Such immigration was mostly illegal and carried out in search of job. However they were valued as a source of cheap labour and the issue of illegal immigration was over looked. The pace of migration rose from...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay
Oil in North America
...Oil in North America. [Annotated Bibliography] Cooper, J.C.B. (2003) Price elasti of demand for crude oil: estimates for 23 countries. OPEC Review 27, pp. 1-8. This article examines the implications of the very high crude oil consumption of the United States, estimating this as some 25% of the entire world production of oil, and the biggest consumption of any single nation. The perspective taken for this analysis the period between 1979 and 2000, and a comparison is made over 23 different countries. All countries demonstrate growth in the demand for oil, despite price fluctuations. Price elasticity is estimated as being low in the short run, and somewhat higher in the long run, but for most countries,...
4 Pages(1000 words)Annotated Bibliography
Japanese history
...Section/# Impacts upon Japanese Society: A Discussion of Bushido Although Hollywood and other forms of world media has made much of a sensation and media circus around the term and understanding of the word “bushido”, the fact of the matter is that this term and its origins and understanding has done a great deal to shape the fabric of both past as well as current Japanese society. As a function of understanding such a construct, this brief analysis will analyze the historical roots of bushido as well as trace some of the ways that bushido has and to a large part continues to impact upon Japanese society and the interpretation thereof. The word bushido itself means “way of the...
2 Pages(500 words)Book Report/Review
Japanese history
... Centralization and Decentralization in Nara and Meiji period Brief Japanese history The uniqueness of Japanese historical culture and literature holds a special place in world civilizations. It took place in three distinct sections, first is the shift to agriculture, followed by the ingress and adoption of Chinese culture and finally, the happenstance with the west economies in the nineteenth century. Specifically, Meiji and Nara era consisted of a multifaceted interplay of centralization and decentralization that shaped Japanese history. The ruling elite and powerful clans during Nara and Meiji era claimed lineage from gods that made Japan and therefore, commanded distinct authority. However, Japan later plunged into civil war... of...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Let us find you another Essay on topic History of the Japanese in North America for FREE!
logo footer
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • StudentShare App Store
  • StudentShare Google play
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • Miscellaneous
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us