Nobody downloaded yet

Principles of sovereignty and human rights - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
In an effort to ensure peaceful co-existence or, at least, minimise the potential for conflict and violence, the community of nations agreed upon a set of principles, or international laws, pertaining to sovereignty and the rights and limitations of states…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER96.3% of users find it useful
Principles of sovereignty and human rights
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
"Principles of sovereignty and human rights"

Download file to see previous pages The principle of sovereignty holds that no nation may intervene in the affairs of another. On the other hand, international humanitarian laws hold that nation states must govern within the limits of respect for the human rights of their populace and upon the blatant violation of those rights, is rendered vulnerable to international humanitarian intervention. Even though, the previous phrasing lends to the assumption of an inherent conflict between human rights and sovereignty, this is not necessarily the case. In brief, as long as nation states adhere to the internationally recognized principles of human rights which they agreed upon and adopted through membership in the United Nations, their right to self-determination and autonomy are inviolable. It is only when they transgress upon the aforementioned do they become vulnerable to legitimate humanitarian intervention, implying infringement upon their sovereignty. Human rights and sovereignty are, accordingly, compatible and not necessarily contentious and conflicting principles. As one moves from the realm of theory to practice, however, one finds that the concept of humanitarian intervention has often been misused and abused for the purposes of justifying transgression against the sovereign rights of nations. .
A critical analysis of the concepts of the right to self-defence, justice and morality on the international stage, indicate that all of the aforementioned have repeatedly been employed as justifications for the transgression against the independence of sovereign nations, with the implication being that while not necessarily contentious, the concepts of humanitarian intervention and sovereignty have been rendered such.
Following the September 11th attacks on the United States, the British government, as did the American, sought the justification of the violation sovereignity of nations through a liberal interpretation of the doctrine of self-defence.
Already, before September 11th the world's view of the justification of military action had been changing. The only clear case in international relations for armed intervention has been self-defense But the notion of intervening on humanitarian grounds had been gaining currency. I set this out, following the Kosovo war, in a speech in Chicago in 1999, where I called for a doctrine of international community, where in certain clear circumstances we do intervene, even though we are not directly threatened. I said this was not just to correct injustice, but also because in an increasingly interdependent world, our self-interest was allied to the interests of others So, for me, before September 11th was already reaching for a different philosophy in international relations from a traditional one that had held sway since the treaty of Westphalia in 1648; namely that a country's internal affairs are for it and you don't interfere unless it threatens you, ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Principles of sovereignty and human rights Essay”, n.d.)
Principles of sovereignty and human rights Essay. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/history/1512567-principles-of-sovereignty-and-human-rights
(Principles of Sovereignty and Human Rights Essay)
Principles of Sovereignty and Human Rights Essay. https://studentshare.org/history/1512567-principles-of-sovereignty-and-human-rights.
“Principles of Sovereignty and Human Rights Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/history/1512567-principles-of-sovereignty-and-human-rights.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
The Human Rights Act 1998 and Parliamentary Sovereignty
...to “disapply” or “invalidate” those statutes.5 Moreover, Parliament reserves the right to repeal the Human Rights Act 1998 under the auspices of Parliamentary sovereignty.6 Feldman takes a similar position to that of Goldsworthy. Feldman argues that the Human Rights Act 1998 does introduce “substantive, constitutional values” via the umbrella of Convention rights.7 According to Feldman’s argument, despite the fact that the 1998 Act introduces new constitutional and substantive values, they are not incompatible with existing rights and the Human Rights Act is designed to...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay
Human Rights
...is constructed clearly manifests this, wherein section 1 defines the rights being upheld, while section 2 defines Government legitimate interferences that may curtail this right. (Ashcroft et al., 1999, p. 22) 3. The general principles as to Government legitimate interferences are set by the European Court of Human Rights following the two cases: Bukta v Hungary [2007] ECHR Application No 25691/04 (17 July 2007) and Makhmudov v Russia [2007] ECHR Application No 35082/04 (26 July 2007), whereby the concerned State parties had been found violating Article 11 (Marauhn, 2007, p. 120). The Court laid the burden of proof on the State, ruling that Government...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
HUMAN RIGHTS
...? International Human Rights Number: Why Human Rights entered the International Political Process Since WWII and How this was done What are Human Rights? The general philosophy of human rights has been designed to address various general questions as pertaining to the universality, existence, legal status, content, nature, legal status and existence of human rights. This section seeks to show what exactly are these human rights, establish why and how they entered into the international political process since WWII, highlight any changes...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay
Human Rights/Political Rights
...in that there is no thought and contemplation of consequences involved. Mill, de Beauvoir and Gandhi all exhibit an indelible link between freedom and morality in their writings. The concept of morality has stringent human rights implications in that moral actions are actions undertaking utilizing the theoretical framework of right and wrong. Utilizing the concept of right and wrong, individuals are bounded to act in a manner such that no harm is brought to other individuals or their basic rights are not infringed upon. The concept of basic rights facilitates itself in the notion of human rights. ...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Human Rights/Political Rights
...HUMAN RIGHTS AND POLITICAL RIGHTS This paper has been written on basis of the works done by Simone deBeauvoir, JohnStuart Mill and some of the political writings by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. The reviews of above mentioned authors have been taken into consideration while preparing this paper. The human and political rights are the important aspects in today’s social life. Every human being has been provided with some basic fundamental rights by their governments to exist in society, which he/she has to follow. Then there are political rights that are used to protect basic fundamental...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Human Rights
...Human Rights The concept of human rights came out from the love and pursuit of wisdom of intellectual means and moral self-discipline of natural rights which are thought to remain alive even when treated harshly by governments or public. Human rights considers the basic rights and independence for which each human being is entitled and comprise the right to life and liberty, freedom of thought and manifestation, and equality before the law of a nation. Few think, practically there is no difference between the two and consider both are same thing, but others keep the terms...
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay
Human Rights
...Declaration of Human Rights, Flinterman and Gutter (n.d.) say, “it stands out as a continuous source of inspiration and lays down the foundations for the international promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms by the United Nations and its Member States” (4). While the composition the provisions of this declaration, a continuous attempt was made to embrace the universality of rights. The universal aspects of human rights were proclaimed in the principles of the UN Charter in order to draw the international respect (Baehr et al, 1999: 49; Gibson, 1991). But this trend to adopt a...
12 Pages(3000 words)Essay
Human Rights
...Human rights Are human rights truly universal? Are the rights in the UDHR too western-biased? Should we try to simplify and reduce the number of human rights? Human rights are not truly universal. The rights differ in their application all over the world, depending on the conditions of the various nations. Article 26, for example, asserts, “Everyone has the right to education.” However, many African children in developing countries fail to access education, given the conditions in their respective countries. The rights in the UNDHR...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay
Human Rights
...Human Rights The article talks of the increase of the female genital mutilation (FGM) in Egypt. It begins by describing the trial of a doctor over the death of 13-year-old girl Suhair al Bataa who had gone through the procedure (Guerin 1). The girl’s father is also being prosecuted. There is also a description of the girl status before the death. Friends and neighbors describe her as being extremely frightened over the procedure (Guerin 1). She had even lost hope of having a good life after the procedure. The FGM is described as being rampant during the summer break when most of the girls are out of school. The FGM is shown to be common due to deep faith and tradition. It is carried out in the name of...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay
Human Rights
...of the attacks (Syria chemical attack, 2013). Samples obtained from the attacked areas by the Organization for the Prohibition of the Chemical Weapons, confirm the presence of sarin, a nerve agent, found in a majority of rockets used in the attacks. These findings are consistent with the organophosphate intoxication found in the blood and urine samples of those who survived the attacks. Reports from the Human Rights Watch have found no evidence for the use of huge quantities of chemicals and possession of rockets by the opposition forces (Syria chemical attack, 2013). However, despite several concrete reports on the role of Syrian government in the attacks, the regimen has denied any role in the attacks...
2 Pages(500 words)Research Paper
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Let us find you another Essay on topic Principles of sovereignty and human rights for FREE!
logo footer
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • StudentShare App Store
  • StudentShare Google play
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • Miscellaneous
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us