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Ethnomethodology - Essay Example

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Name Date Course Section/# Title: The Global Village: A Discussion and Analysis of Parity and Equality An uncomfortable and unmistakable reality of the current world is that inequality continues to be a pervasive reality with regards to the distribution of wealth, lifestyles, and health experience that the population of the earth shares…
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Ethnomethodology
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"Ethnomethodology"

Download file to see previous pages As a function of this realization, the following analysis will engage the reader with a discussion of a global village, comprised of only 100 people – with representatives from around the globe, as well as seeking to promote a further level of understanding and appreciation for the way in which a more equitable representation of life within this village could be affected. It is the hope of this author that such a level of analysis will be beneficial and eye-opening with regards to many of the issues that currently face the global system. From the prompt of this essay, it was noted that of the 100 individuals that comprise the population of this village, 50 of them would suffer from now nutrition, one of them would be dying of starvation, over 80 would live in substandard housing; moreover, of the 67 adults that would live within this village, over half of them would be unable to read or write. More specifically, only one individual within the entire village would have a college education. Of the 50 individuals who were members of the paid workforce, only 33 could define themselves as full-time employees with a stable/steady job. Interestingly, of these 100 residents in such a village, only five of them would be American. Yet, these five American individuals would hold 32% of the wealth of the entire village; by means of comparison, 33 people would live on 3% of the total wealth of the village. From the statistics that have thus far been presented, it can clearly be denoted that a fundamental level of inequality and disparity is represented within such a global village. Ultimately, the query for this particular analysis is concentric upon trying to understand the way in which the wealthy five individuals could live in peace with their neighbors; serving as a microcosm for the greater argument of how the United States, a uni-polar force and dynamic economic powerhouse within the world, can continue to integrate a fair and equitable manner with the world that suffers from inequality, poverty, hardship, lack of education, and all of the other issues that have thus far been represented. The first step that can and should necessarily be made with regards to creating a more ethical and moral approach to the global realities that define our world, is with regards to demanding a level of educational parity around the world. Since the conclusion of the Second World War, the United States and other powerful Western economies have been in the position to enforce legislation and global commands upon a litany of different nations around the globe. Invariably, these requirements have been concentric upon economic requests and constraints of financial integration. However, in order to impact upon poverty, hopelessness, starvation, and a litany of other different issues that were researched and covered within the introduction of this brief analysis, it is absolutely interval to demand a level of educational attainment and access to each of the individuals living within this global village. Experts and scholars have long denoted that almost each of the negative realities that currently define the inequality that exists between the very rich and the very poor are contingent upon an overall lack of access and/or a lack of ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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