We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Nobody downloaded yet

China (1000-1600CE) economic - Research Paper Example

Comments (0)
Summary
In the course of industrial development in the 11th century, the Chinese developed technology that was sophisticated enough to use coal energy for iron production. During that century, iron production increased several-fold over what was produced previously…
Download full paper
GRAB THE BEST PAPER
China (1000-1600CE) economic
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
China (1000-1600CE) economic

Download file to see previous pages... Moreover, the production of coal was also increased and this was because an estimated one million households were using it every day for heating purposes.1 In those centuries, the light industry also continued to prosper in China and it included the making of porcelain, the building of ships and the textile industry. The making of textiles especially grew considerably and many families worked in this industry and depended on it to make a living.2 The rate of urbanization also increased as people realized that it was in the cities that wealth could be made. Several industries were heavily regulated by the government and these included the production of sulphur, which was a crucial ingredient in the production of gunpowder, which was then a new weapon component. The other industry that was under the government monopoly was the tea industry, whose revenues the government used to fund the equipment of its military. As for agricultural development in that period, there were great agricultural advancements and this was because the government encouraged and sponsored irrigation projects, which increased the amount of land that could be cultivated. Furthermore, the government often encouraged the peasants to cultivate more land so that they could produce enough food for themselves and the surplus could be kept for emergency purposes. A large variety of crops were cultivated and these included rice, which was a staple, and other specialized crops such as oranges and sugarcane which tended to be planted alongside rice. Many peasants sold the surplus of the food they had produced, and they further added to this income through the making of sculptures among other handicraft, and this ensured that they had a steady income to enable them to live comfortably. It was during this period that a new breed of rice, called champa, was introduced in China, which had more yields than the other types of rice planted before, and this ensured the food security of the entire population of this state for a long time to come.3 The structure of agricultural production also changes in such a way that, whereas before agriculture had either been dominated by the land owning aristocracy or self-sufficient peasants, in this period, agricultural production came to be dominated by a non-aristocratic land owning class. In this system, most of the farmers did not own the land, which they farmed, and instead, they were tenants to these new landowners. Commercial development. The merchant class of this time had become more sophisticated than its predecessors and not only was it well organized, but it was also very much respected in the Chinese society. These merchants through their business ventures managed to accumulate great wealth and it is said that this wealth even rivaled that of the educated class government officials. Many merchants were members of guilds, which were organized according to the sort of products they put on the market. Those tended to set the costs of the particular products that they sold.4 In the urban areas of China, the privately owned businesses dominated the markets in these cities. The most successful businesses in this period tended to be family owned enterprises and these experienced a fair amount of success as the quality of products from particular businesses was well known by their customers. The government’s lifting of all restrictions to trading activities greatly enhanced the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
China Economic Growth Since 1949
China Economic Growth Since 1949 Impressive economic achievements of the PRC are second largest in the world. Republic of china is the fastest growing economy having consistent growth rates of around 10% over the past 30 years. China is largest exporter and 2nd largest importer worldwide.
9 Pages(2250 words)Research Paper
Does China threaten U.S. global economic dominance
Its economic growth has averaged at 9% over the last ten years, and despite the credit crunch was able to register a 10.3% GDP growth in 2011i . The extrapolation of the strength of China and the emerging economies leads to the analysts’ projection that they will most likely overtake the G7- the world’s largest industrialized markets by 2032ii.
4 Pages(1000 words)Research Paper
Does China Threaten U.S. Global Economic Dominance
In 2010, China became the second largest economy in the world. It overtook Japan, Germany, UK, France and all other industrialized countries in Western Europei. As of today, it registered a phenomenal growth rate of 9.7% (second quarter of 2011) despite the volatile international situation which is way ahead of the dismal 2% growth rate of United States.
5 Pages(1250 words)Research Paper
China Versus India Economic Growth
China’s economy is highly developed than that one of India. While India is the 11th biggest economy in terms of the various exchange rates (Chow, 2001). China takes the number two position passing Japan (Runckel, 2002). In comparison of the estimated $1.3123 trillion Gross Domestic Product of India, China posses an average GDP of close to $4909.28 billion (Chow, 2001).
4 Pages(1000 words)Research Paper
Economic Comparison of China and USA Performance
This paper primarily focuses on comparison of various major economic factors, that characterizes development patterns in China and the United States. These economic factors identified for comparison include labor force, household income, poverty line, unemployment, currency exchange rates, GDP per capita, exports, GDP, imports and others.
5 Pages(1250 words)Research Paper
Economic globalization in China
It opposed the global economic order, political order and the major global institutions such as the IMF and the World Bank before the reforms started in China (Overholt, p.3). Earlier, China like socialist countries perceived globalization as a product of
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay
China Economic Report
Numerous questions still disturb analysts and this has to do largely with perspectives the analysts decide to take. For example, issues such as whether China’s international policy is premised on
5 Pages(1250 words)Research Paper
Economic Analysis of China
A decade ago, the current account surplus of the country was at 2% of the Gross domestic Product while the reserves in foreign exchange were at 14% of the same or 166 billion dollars. In the year 2010, the current account surplus of the country was above 5% of GDP,
6 Pages(1500 words)Research Paper
China's economic growth
However, China has now put into place five principles that were articulated through the Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai in 1953, which were
4 Pages(1000 words)Research Paper
Economic Development of China
It has been able to experience a Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of around 10 percent every year and this has enabled many people in the economy to shift from their poverty levels. It has an estimated population of 1.3 billion people and its
10 Pages(2500 words)Research Paper
Let us find you another Research Paper on topic China (1000-1600CE) economic for FREE!
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us