We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Civil Rights - Essay Example

Free
The Muslim separatist ideology, synonymous with the Nation of Islam, and which Malcolm subscribed to, was seen as radically extreme Not only did it challenge black integration into the white society pursued by the Martin Luther-led civil rights activists, it also viewed the white people in America as devil’s advocates created to harm the black population in America. A few years before his death, Malcolm reconsidered his radical beliefs and embraced the ideas followed by Martin Luther and his Civil Rights Movement: the idea to pursue equality through nonviolent means and the need for integration of black people into the White-dominated society. Strategies employed by civil rights activists and their followers yielded legislative and judicial reforms that ruled against segregation of the blacks by the white population. For instance, the Civil Rights Act (1964) was passed by the American senate and it banned segregation based on cilor, race, religion, or national origin in public accommodations and employment practices. There was also the 1965 Voting Rights Act that ensured protection of voting rights including those of the black people. There was also the fair Housing Act (1968) that prohibited segregation in the rental or sale of housing units. A positive result of the Civil Rights Struggle was the entrance of Afro-American people into politics of the south. Seeking legal redress by the Civil rights activists was seen as a futile exercise in a society dominated by White Americans, often

Check these samples - they also fit your topic

Civil Rights
This courageous act of civil disobedience incited the masses, both black and white persons, in protesting racial inequalities during the 1950’s and 1960’s. The mass nationwide protests culminated in a major change in racial relations in the country in addition to changes in laws designed to protect the rights of minorities most significantly the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
12 pages (3000 words)Essay
CIVIL RIGHTS
However, I was not the only one to be the target of their hatred; on the contrary, the African Americans and South Asians are also looked upon with unabated abhorrence, suspicion and displeasure by an overwhelming majority of the WASP and narrow-minded extremist Arabians.
2 pages (500 words)Essay
Civil Rights
In the speech given on August 28, 1963 known as “I Have a Dream,” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. inspired the minds of millions to believe in the moral progress of society and the process of social justice primarily as means through which African-Americans could enter into full equality in the country.
2 pages (500 words)Essay
Civil Rights
On the other hand, the Fifteenth Amendment granted African American men the right to cast their vote. In spite of having acknowledged equal rights with respect to the United States Constitution, a lot more white people persisted to show prejudice against African Americans across the United States (McDowell 20-40).
3 pages (750 words)Essay
Civil Rights
Civil Rights Name Course Course instructor Date Civil rights movement accomplished more than just removal of racial barriers; it also refurbished America socially, politically and culturally. The movement started during the Brown v. Board of Education ruling of 1954 up to the time of passage of the Voting Rights Acts in 1965 thus leading to unbelievable changes that most people currently enjoy in America.
2 pages (500 words)Essay
Civil Rights
They were treated as second class citizens. They could not raise voice for their right as mostly they were kept ignorant and even if they raised a voice, the action would be taken against them. This ensued a social unrest situation. The government reacted on their behalf and created a Congress for Racial Equality in 1942.
5 pages (1250 words)Essay
Civil Rights
Fourteenth Amendment made all Americans equal before the law, yet for the next century Jim Crow laws still prevailed. The government was not ready to enforce these laws. The American white society was not ready to accept the new order. Court battles waged by National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) had proved to be ineffective.
4 pages (1000 words)Essay
Civil rights
White Americans joined Blacks in the civil rights struggle; southerners as well as northerners disturbed and troubled, Midwesterners and westerners took part, women along with men dissented. Elderly and young Americans were dynamic in the struggle as well; though, middle school to college students came to the struggle much later than the majority.
4 pages (1000 words)Essay
Civil Rights
(Civil Rights: and Overview) Under the Civil Right concept, “Suffrage”, “is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. In
4 pages (1000 words)Essay
Civil Rights & Civil Liberties
In dissimilarity to political rights, which is only exercised through conditioned eligibility as a registered voter or candidates, civil liberty is enjoyed universally. Currently, (Baker, Thomas, 2006),
2 pages (500 words)Essay
seen to hold influential positions in the American system at the time. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (founded in 1909) broke this trend and sought several legal...
The Civil Rights Movement employed strategies such as boycotts like the 1955-1956 Bus boycott in Montgomery that lasted for 382 days. This boycott led the American Supreme Court to declare the laws supporting segregation in buses as unconstitutional. This cemented way for impartiality among the whites and the blacks when accessing bus services. Organizers of this boycott included Martin Luther King Jr, who was arrested and subjected to abuse and his home barraged. He however remained a first rank leader in the civil rights movement (Bass, 2001). There were other tactics used by the civil rights activists that included sit-ins, protest marches and other nonviolent activities. It is important to note that initially, a number of civil rights activists subscribed to different ideologies in the civil rights movement. For instance, Martin Luther King Jr adopted Christian based ideologies when he clinched the presidency of the Southern Christian Conference on Leadership. Martin was also a staunch Christian born in a Christian family and at one time pursued theological studies at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania. In his civil rights speeches and lectures, he advocated for use of nonviolence measures and the need for black integration into the White dominated society. This is different to what activists such as Malcolm X stood for and believed. Malcolm was a Black Muslim who was radical at the beginning of his civil rights struggle. He initially challenged the nonviolent approach used by other civil rights activists that included Martin Luther King Jr. He also challenged the integrationist aim pursued by Martin’s followers and civil rights colleagues.He was a follower of the Nation of Islam, a group that he had joined when he was imprisoned in 1946.
The Muslim separatist ideology, synonymous with the Nation of Islam, and which Malcolm subscribed to, was seen as radically extreme Not only did it challenge black integration into the white society pursued by the Martin Luther-led civil rights activists, it also viewed the white people in America as devil’s advocates created to harm the black population in America. A few years before his death, Malcolm reconsidered his radical beliefs and embraced the ideas followed by Martin Luther and his Civil Rights Movement: the idea to pursue equality through nonviolent means and the need for integration of black people into the White-dominated society.Strategies employed by civil rights activists and their followers yielded legislative and judicial reforms that ruled against segregation of the blacks by the white population. For instance, the Civil Rights Act (1964) was passed by the American senate and it banned segregation based on cilor, race, religion, or national origin in public accommodations and employment practices. There was also the 1965 Voting Rights Act that ensured protection of voting rights including those of the black people. There was also the fair Housing Act (1968) that prohibited segregation in the rental or sale of housing units. A positive result of the Civil Rights Struggle was the entrance of Afro-American people into politics of the south.Seeking legal redress by the Civil rights activists was seen as a futile exercise in a society dominated by White Americans, often seen to hold influential positions in the American system at the time. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (founded in 1909) broke this trend and sought several legal actions in the Supreme Court. The court ruled in favor of the Civil Rights activists in the legal case that sought to end racial segregation in buses (This was after the 382-day long bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama). In another landmark case involving the association, the Supreme Court rejected the separate colored and white schools system. It was a case pitying a Mr. Brown against the Board of Education. This was ruling was made in 1954 and it implied that the “separate but equal” philosophy governing school systems was not applicable any more. A look at the ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail’ written by Martin Luther King Jr reveals that the Southern Christian Leadership Conference that Martin headed as president was an organization that operated in every state in the south and its headquarters were in Atlanta, Georgia (Bass, 2001). Birmingham is manifested in this letter as a city full of segregation towards the black community: police are brutal, unresolved bombings targeting Negroe homes, churches and businesses. He defended the nonviolent actions saying that they seek to develop a crisis and establish tension such that a community that has ignored negotiations is forced to counter the issue. Nonviolent action seeks to blow up the issue such that it cannot be ignored any longer. Nonviolent tension is therefore necessary for advancement and growth. It is true that much of the advances made in the civil rights struggle came through the federal courts. This does not mean that local organizations and individuals did not play an important role in the struggle. The dreams of these influential civil rights activists were dreams of equality and the complete realization of these dreams was the enactment of legislative laws that would safeguard the achievements of the Civil Rights Movement (Bass, 2001). This would also call for courts to determine there rulings in a fair and impartial manner and not dishing out rulings based on segregation. Courts also reviewed and overturned segregational rulings that had been made earlier with the aim to reconstruct public image in and outside America. As Luther puts it in the Letter from Birmingham Jail, even a section of the church through the White preachers hindered the civil rights movement. He regrets to note that white church ministers, rabbis and priests in the south ignored to understand the civil rights movement as well as misrepresenting the rights movement’s leaders. He accuses numerous religious leaders in the south of calling upon their congregations to adhere to the desegregation stand because it is based on the law, thus, the white opposition did try to hinder the civil rights movement but eventually failed to contain the pressure emanating from both internal and external sources.
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Civil Rights Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words”, n.d.)
Civil Rights Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/history/1434912-civil-rights
(Civil Rights Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words)
Civil Rights Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words. https://studentshare.org/history/1434912-civil-rights.
“Civil Rights Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/history/1434912-civil-rights.
  • Cited: 0 times

Summary

Name Instructor Task Date The Civil Rights Movement refers to the struggle on American soil whose objective was to fight segregation against the African Americans. There was racial indignity, and more so, there was no freedom from oppression that the white Americans directed towards their black counterparts…
Civil Rights
Read TextPreview
Comments (1)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
al
altremblay added comment 21 days ago
Student rated this paper as
This document saved me today. I liked the structure. It was very useful for my history course.
Let us find you another Essay on topic Civil Rights for FREE!
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us