We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Nobody downloaded yet

Hobbes and Locke on the Evolution of the Civil Society - Term Paper Example

Comments (0)
Summary
Name Instructor Class 23 June 2011 Hobbes and Locke on the Evolution of the “Civil Society” Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) and his book Leviathan greatly influenced political thought in the seventeenth century, by arguing for the importance of the “social contract” in achieving peace and civil unity…
Download full paper
GRAB THE BEST PAPER
Hobbes and Locke on the Evolution of the Civil Society
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
Hobbes and Locke on the Evolution of the Civil Society

Download file to see previous pages... Their views are important for international political thought, because they influenced present international political economy theories and helped paved the debate on political ideology, particularly shaping the discourse on the concept of “civil society” and the rise of nation-states vis-a-vis “civil society.” Locke and Hobbes have diverging views on the relationship between the government and civil society, as well as the notions of slavery, sovereignty, direction of international politics, and peace, but they share somewhat similar beliefs in the role of education and the state of nature of humanity. Locke and Hobbes have diverging views on the relationship between the government and civil society. Hobbes believes that Europe has changed as a civil society through the evolution of the social contract. The Commonwealth only exists because of the Covenant between the people and the government or the state. Hobbes says in the Leviathan: “Essence of the Common-wealth; which (to define it) is ‘One Person, of whose Acts a great Multitude, by mutual Covenants one with another, have made themselves every one the Author, to the end he may use the strength and means of them all, as he shall think expedient, for their Peace and Common Defense.’” This statement shows that the main goal of the government is to ensure peace and national defense. The covenant or social contract, however, for Hobbes is absolute, where the state incorporates the wills of the individuals; the state is the body and individuals are just parts of it: “The only way to erect such a Common Power” is “to confer all their power and strength upon one Man, or upon one Assembly of men, that may reduce all their Wills, by plurality of voices, unto one Will” (Hobbes). This statement underscores that the social contract binds all individuals. On the one hand, it enforces plurality of wills. On the other hand, it means the precedence of the state over civil society. Locke confirms the same views as Hobbes and argues that Europe also changed because of the need for the social contract. Unlike Hobbes, Locke believes that people take part of social contracts merely to help adjudicate disputes between individuals or groups. He says: “And this is done, where-ever any number of men, in the state of nature, enter into society to make one people, one body politic, under one supreme government…to make laws for him, as the public good of the society shall require…” (Locke, Two Treatises on Government). From here, it is clear that Locke believes that it is the people or civil society that legitimizes the state; while for Hobbes, it is the government that legitimizes the existence of a peaceful civil society. My criticism of Hobbes is that he overlooks that the people make the government. The social contract binds the people, but the people can unbind some laws too in order to make the contract fit their changing needs and issues. I agree more with Locke, who reminds governments of their servitude to the civil society. It does not mean, however, that the civil society will also abuse its rights and fully void the social contract without due justifications. Locke and Hobbes diverge on the notion of sovereignty. Locke argues that civil society precedes the state. For him, it is society that provides the state its essential source of legitimacy. He contends that when the rulers fail to encourage interests, independence, ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
Critical Review Paper Expansion
John Locke (1632-1704) and his work Two Treatises on Government (1690) is also a seminal work on political thought, because he stresses the precedence of civil society over the government. Kant and Rousseau are also prominent philosophers. These political thinkers have similarities and differences in how the idea of Europe as a “Civil Society” changed over time.
10 Pages(2500 words)Term Paper
Compare and contrast the two philosophers of politics: John locke and Thomas Hobbes
In this study it will be argued that, while Locke placed utmost importance on the idea of natural rights, Hobbes was early proponent of utilitarian concepts in politics, which informs the antagonism between their positions
16 Pages(4000 words)Term Paper
Philosopher Biography: John Locke
Jefferson would once say, “Bacon, Locke, Newton ... I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived, without any exception, and as having laid the foundation of those superstructures which have been raised in the Physical and Moral sciences" (‘Three Greatest Men’).
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper
Social Construct According to Locke
Social contract was a progressive revolution that inspired reforms in many nations all over the world. In many European nations, social contract was always against monarchs who thought that they were empowered to legislate. The contract between the citizenry determines whether there can be a political authority that is legitimate.
4 Pages(1000 words)Term Paper
Hobbes and Lockes
They want to understand how people can do away with their State of Nature, so that they can produce productive civil societies. This paper aims to compare Hobbes’ and Locke’s concepts and premises regarding consent, contracts, and states of nature. Hobbes and Locke have similarities in the justification of the formation of consent and contracts, but not in its dissolution, because of their contending views on the State of Nature.
6 Pages(1500 words)Term Paper
Comparing the differences of purpose of government according to Philosophers. (Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, and Locke)
Purpose of Government according to Philosophers. The purpose for which governments should exist has been a preoccupation of philosophers from the classical period to the modern societies. While Plato and Aristotle represent classical philosophers, Hobbes and Locke are a part of what is seen as modern philosophers.
5 Pages(1250 words)Term Paper
Evolution
In specific, different theories exist in the case of evolution; however, theistic evolution is one of the theories that have been able to influence people. It
5 Pages(1250 words)Term Paper
The Evolution of the Civil Society
Locke and Hobbes have diverging views on the relationship between the government and civil society. Hobbes believes that Europe has changed as a civil society through the evolution of the social contract. The Commonwealth only exists because of the Covenant between the people and the government or the state.
8 Pages(1250 words)Term Paper
Summary time,space, and the evolution of afro-america society
Social stratification was provided on the basis of cultural difference between creoles and new arrivals. Northern blacks were accommodated into the emerging euro-American culture due to a different form of
1 Pages(250 words)Term Paper
EVOLUTION
On the other hand, disruptive selection occurs when extreme traits are chosen over intermediate traits whereas stabilizing selection is when intermediate traits are selected over extreme traits. 8. Genetic drift and mutation can lead to
2 Pages(500 words)Term Paper
Let us find you another Term Paper on topic Hobbes and Locke on the Evolution of the Civil Society for FREE!
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us