StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Western Civilization. Second World War - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
An event as catastrophic and disastrous as a world war cannot be a result of any single cause. Like a volcano that is simmering till the inner pressures causes it to erupt, so the simmering discontent of the German people finally resulted in the Second World War…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER94.3% of users find it useful
Western Civilization. Second World War
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Western Civilization. Second World War"

Download file to see previous pages The basic causes of war are always found in international rivalries, thwarted desires of nations, and the ambitions of their leaders. Most historians agree that the seeds of the Second World War have been sown soon after the end of the First World War. During the months and years after the First World War, political and economic events like the treaty of Versailles, the great economic depression of 1929, the rise of Nazism, and Hitler’s ambitions for German expansion were some of the causes of the war to come. The treaty of Versailles signed in June 1919 by the allied powers who were the victors of the First World War was very harsh on Germany and held the country solely responsible for the war. The German people believed that Woodrow Wilson’s fourteen points program would be the basis for the treaty, but the French president Georges Clemenceau and the British prime minister David Lloyd George bowed before the anger of their people who demanded that Germany should be severely punished for the suffering and devastation caused. The sentiment of the allies was as follows, “If these things are hardships for Germany, they are hardships which Germany has brought upon herself” (“Allied Reply”). The humiliating terms of the treaty whipped up feelings of anger and frustration among the Germans. Territorial losses, the reduction of the army and navy, and, above all, the fact that Germany was forced to accept the responsibility for having caused the war, were particularly galling. According to the treaty, Germany was forced to pay reparation for the damages suffered in the war by the victors; the map of Europe was redrawn, and parts of Germany were transferred to countries like France, Poland, Belgium, Denmark, and Czechoslovakia. The reparations that Germany was forced to pay was an added burden on the country’s already stretched finances. The German economy, in shambles after the war, was further eroded by the fact that the country had lost some of its colonies that were rich sources of income and raw materials. Besides the economic burden, Germany had lost millions of her able bodied men who would have constituted a strong work force. The people thought the government had betrayed them, so they did not trust it. The monarchy was overthrown and a new democratic republic called the Weimar Republic was proclaimed; it fell in 1933 under the onslaught of the myriad problems Germany faced. Hitler used the treaty of Versailles as a battle cry to rally the people and promised that Germany would take her rightful place as a strong nation before long. This was a balm to the wounded pride of the nation, and people were ready to back Hitler by 1933. By 1929, the German economy was just beginning to recover from the effects of the First World War with the efforts of Gustav Stresemann, Germany’s untiring foreign minister, beginning to show results. The stock market crash of 1929 that reverberated across the globe and sent financial markets around the world into a tailspin also crushed German hopes of economic recovery. The German economy, propped up by loans from America, was “only flourishing on the surface. Germany is in fact dancing on a volcano. If the short-term credits are called in, a large section of our economy would collapse” (“Weimar Republic and the Great Depression”). Just before Stresemann’s death, his words have proved prophetic. The German economy, which depended on American loans for capital, was badly hit when America needed the funds to prop up her own faltering economy after the crash. Foreign trade dried up, and German industry ground to a halt. As a result, workers were laid off, which has increased unemployment and resulted in the misery of the people just beginning to look forward to a brighter ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Western Civilization. Second World War Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/history/1398788-western-civilization
(Western Civilization. Second World War Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 Words)
https://studentshare.org/history/1398788-western-civilization.
“Western Civilization. Second World War Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/history/1398788-western-civilization.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Western Civilization. Second World War

Comparison of the Cold War International System to the Current International System

An example is that of the Korean War (1950-53) which is said to transform the nature of the Cold War, while its initial impact was to solidify the division of the world into political, military, and economic spheres. Take Germany for instance where imperialism was a victim challenged by the historians for the destruction of the German Government along with its supporters used to conduct (Keylor, 2001, p. 44). That indicates economic expansion and territorial acquisition has always been a problem promoted since the First World War. Even in the 1920s, it was fashionable to declare the German empire on the threshold of the ‘Great War’ (Keylor, 2001, p. 44).

Europe in the global context remained tense and divide...
8 Pages(2000 words)Article

Managing Emerging Technologies: The World Bank Group

information Technology helps the businesses in cutting costs and creating value to the organization as a whole, by minimizing the digital divide. This helps in developing new and effective business processes as well as in making value propositions especially in the new and modern corporate world whose business network is spread far and wide, such as the World Bank for instance. Information technology plays a vital role in integrating systems and strengthening the strategic ties between service providers and customers, thereby rendering effective services.
The World Bank is involved in various activities providing a wide range of services to several developing and in transition countries across the globe. The bank, owned, fina...
11 Pages(2750 words)Case Study

Traditional Women in the Modern World

It is within the family that many attributes of gender inequality are generated and replicated. Economic and interpersonal dependence on both genders and in various instances more vicious forms of inferiority, are classic elements of marriage and family. Women’s long-established roles leave them with the trouble of widespread domestic and nurturance obligations in addition to limited authority within the family. These trends represent gender inequality within the home and are echoed in the ideology justifying a gender-separated workforce in which women’s earnings and prospects are disproportionate to men’s. While almost every woman has some family bonds to men, by their kinship ties to their fathers and brothers,...
9 Pages(2250 words)Assignment

The World Food Program

However, like many organizations, the World Food Program has its own crises that have apparently affected its programs and projects in all parts of the world. These problems, which will be discussed later, limit WFPs' capacity to distribute its resources and services to distressed countries like Ethiopia. It must be noted that in recent years, food rationing was cut by one third (WFP, 2008). In September 2008, WFP published its Media Backgrounder on Ethiopia which reported that the organization targets to support 9.6 million Ethiopians as well as its funding shortage of US$ 465 million. It also recorder 567,000 metric tons shortage of food which will last until March 2009 (WFP, 2008).
Ethiopia has been among the poorest and l...
9 Pages(2250 words)Assignment

The Importance of Employee Empowerment in the Global World

Empowerment is the authority to make decisions within one’s area of operation without having to get approval; from anyone else. Here the operatives are encouraged to use their initiative to do things the way they like. To this end, the employees are given not just authority but resources as well so that they not only take decisions but implement them quickly. This empowerment means giving the employees the authority to make decisions and providing them with financial resources to implement these decisions (Koch & Godden, 1997 11).
Employee participation and empowerment participation means sharing the decision making power with the lower ranks of an organization in an appropriate manner (Lashley & McGoldrick, 199...
9 Pages(2250 words)Assignment

Roles of the African American Soldiers in the Korean War

In 1950, nearly eight percent of the total military force standing in Korea was comprised of African-American servicemen, equally approximately one hundred thousand individuals willing to fight and possibly die for their country. The country which finally gave these men this opportunity, at this time, was undergoing radical change at home and abroad in wartime. As African-Americans sought and acquired more social and economic freedom, and the consequent political power, military officials realized the underutilization of Black soldiers. As a result, the Korean War marks for the first time a major role granted to African-Americans to contribute in a significant fashion to the military endeavors of the United States.
That which...
7 Pages(1750 words)Essay

Culture's Portrayal of the Vietnam War - A Criticism Misdirected

Most of the popular culture images were highly critical of the war and painted the US forces as brutal intruders into an otherwise peaceful and innocent jungle scene. From the viewpoint of the popular culture, its images and art, everybody had a scene to play and everybody got it wrong. The lowly buck private was no less responsible than the Commander in Chief, and the Pentagon shared equal guilt with the Military-Industrial Complex. Was the criticism legitimate? From the viewpoint of the actors, agents, and citizens that filled these roles, the medias criticism of the war and their grim portrayal of the times, was an exaggerated stretch of reality that forever tarnished the reputation of an entire generation.

It was ea...
7 Pages(1750 words)Assignment

In What Ways Did 20th Century Conflicts Change the Nature of Western Introspection

The 20th century period was marked by several conflicts: World War I, the Holocaust, World War II, the exploitation of Latin American countries, Racial Segregation and the Negro Revolution which spawned the Civil Rights Movement in America and the Feminist Movement.

The Holocaust is admittedly one of the most horrific events in the history of mankind and the impact of the horrors it brought changed the way Ellie Wiesel sees his faith. While Jews are known for their orthodox and unquestioning faith in God, Wiesel’s experiences in the concentration camps of Auschwitz compelled her to question God’s existence. In Night, Wiesel tells of the unspeakable hanging of a young boy who was left dangling for thirty min...
8 Pages(2000 words)Assignment

Syllabus Design for Learners of English as a Second Language

The translation and transmutation of syllabuses into the teaching procedures are generally recognized by the established conceptions of the second language learning methodologies, predominant amongst them are the Grammar Translation Method and Audiolingual Method. These notions in addition to the emergent concepts aiding to the structuring of the syllabus and curriculum for English as the Second Language are critically discussed in detail in this literary essay.

English being globally considered and established as the ‘lingua franca’ whether in terms of international communications or technological interrelations, hence English as the second language is extensively popularized and most sought after language...
7 Pages(1750 words)Research Paper

Is the Business World Flat or Spiky

On the other hand, these globalization standards are opposed by some critics and argue that globalization does not have to be a requirement for putting up a business in other countries, thus it is just a choice for entering a foreign market. Accordingly, standardization is applicable specifically to high-end markets and with accord to the market segmentation such as the trends that the young people patronize (Mullman, 2006) Regardless of the idea that globalization is mostly based on how the company standardizes the products, the home country still holds the profitability of the business as the economy affects how the foreign investors and other national sources back up the business (Stiglitz, 2006).
Making the world flat mak...
9 Pages(2250 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Western Civilization. Second World War for FREE!

Contact Us