StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Childrens Learning in the Early Years - Thesis Proposal Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The Importance of Play Play is a child’s world. It is an avenue where one can be free to be oneself without anyone imposing rules or restrictions to conform to society’s standards…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER98.4% of users find it useful
Childrens Learning in the Early Years
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Childrens Learning in the Early Years"

Download file to see previous pages It engages the mind to actively imagine various scenarios for fun or for problem-solving. Babies and toddlers play in order to get to know their world – how things work, how people react, etc. They get to explore and discover things that otherwise they will not learn about if they do not actively engage in play. This free exploration is considered Heuristic play by Holland (2003) and encourages it without adult intervention. Adults provide simple materials and allow the child’s imagination to take off. “The child learns from observing directly what these objects will ‘do’ or ‘not do’, in sharp contrast to much of the ‘educational’ equipment which has a result predetermined by the design which has been devised by the adult maker (Holland, 2003, p. 142). Not only will heuristic play stimulate a child’s thinking, but it also develops his creativity as he will see in his mind endless possibilities in imaginatively transforming ordinary objects into various things with various functions. Young children learn better in play- like settings because they retain concepts better when learned in the spirit of fun. Macintyre (2003) discusses the value of play in all the developmental areas of children. Children love games that stimulate thinking. Such cognitive benefits extend to their real lives as they make decisions, compare and contrast things, use their imaginations and thinking critically and creatively. Play also engages the body. Certain games involve gross and fine motor coordination. Running around, jumping, tumbling and other physical activities help them be physically fit as well as release tension. Much practice in physical play develops their muscles, agility, flexibility and endurance. Socially, play fosters the development of friendships, coaxing children out of their shells. As they play with other children or adults, they get to know about how other people behave, think and feel. They also get to learn socially acceptable behavior like not hurting others and playing fair. Most importantly, they get to know themselves better- how they react to certain situations in the play setting. Play may also be an outlet for emotional release. Young children use role play or puppet play to process experiences they do not fully understand. Doing it over and over helps them realize what was wrong or right in confusing situations. Resolving issues in play may also be therapeutic for some children. B. Linking Play to Literacy Educators are now coming to understand that learner-centered strategies are more effective in engaging young children’s learning since it puts much value in the young learners’ construction of their own understanding of concepts. This makes learning more meaningful and relevant to them, hence, retention of concepts and skills is easier to achieve. Play is one approach to learning many concepts and skills. Reading and writing skills spring out of play-like story-reading sessions. These are examples of activities wherein children’s imaginations are actively engaged, as it is in their play. Books and sharing stories are just a few of the learning materials and activities that enhance communication, language and literacy skills. These help concretize learning for very young children in the company of other learners who may contribute much to their shared learning. Emergent literacy is the term used to refer to the earliest period of a child’s literacy development, specifically the time between birth and when the child can read and write (Sulzby and Teale, 1991). According to emergent literacy theories, the child is the central figure in the construction of learning. His life experiences directly affect his literacy. One theoretical perspective in ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Childrens Learning in the Early Years Thesis Proposal”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/health-sciences-medicine/1405562-childrens-learning-in-the-early-years
(Childrens Learning in the Early Years Thesis Proposal)
https://studentshare.org/health-sciences-medicine/1405562-childrens-learning-in-the-early-years.
“Childrens Learning in the Early Years Thesis Proposal”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/health-sciences-medicine/1405562-childrens-learning-in-the-early-years.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Childrens Learning in the Early Years

Garcia Marquezs One Hundred Years of Solitude

The dividing line between contrasting features cannot be drawn as it was the author’s intention to present reality through magical happenings and incredible events.  

Marquez’s novel refers to magical realism which is ‘a mode of narration that naturalizes the supernatural, that is to say, a mode in which real and fantastic, natural and supernatural, are coherently represented in a state of rigorous equivalence – neither has a greater claim to truth or referentiality’.2

The author tries to delete the demarcation line between reality and imagination, history and myth. The line between reality and fantasy is intentionally blurred. That’s why attempting to separate re...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Evaluation of the Course: Teaching and Learning Strategies

I will begin my evaluation with the objectives of the course, discuss a theory that is relevant to learning styles to see how it fits with the course and then provide my conclusions about how this course meets the objectives of the course.

 I am assuming that the Teaching and Learning Strategies class was created for students at the college level who were going into some form of teaching or training.

To evaluate this course it is a good idea to start from the beginning and look at the objectives. As I was looking for references in this process, I found a website that had tips for designing instruction that I felt would offer me a structure to work within. According to "Instructional Design," the instruct...
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper

Holistic Approaches to Infant Development 0-8 Years

see the child as like a seed that contains all the elements to produce a fruit if given the proper amounts of nutrients from the soil and water along with sunshine and an ideal climate (Brewer, 2001). The Constructivists, founded on the works of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky, believe that children are not passive recipients of knowledge, rather, they actively work at organizing their experience into constructing their own learning.
The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) is a resource for early childhood care and education practitioners to support the needs of young children under their care. It sets standards for learning, development and care for children up to five years of age. EYFS provides a wide variety of information o...
18 Pages(4500 words)Term Paper

Outlining Explicit Learning Objectives and Outcomes for Teachers and Students

Explicit learning is presented by teaching the specific concepts individually and mastery occurs then after. The main key in such a mode of teaching is being highly structured in every activity that is undertaken inside the classroom can be considered as part of the organization of the technique. One of the defining features of the technique is the fact that the teacher commonly points out the part of the lesson where they are in, thus, the term used is explicit teaching (Boyles, 2002).
The explicit form of teaching can be considered to fit lessons that are considered to introduce certain concepts, ideas or skills that are needed to be learned and that the students have low familiarity or experience with. For that matter, the...
10 Pages(2500 words)Report

Organisational Learning in Educational Institutions

Conventional understandings will be reviewed and reinterpreted based on the actual practice and needs of such organizations.

Most literature on organizational development tends to be for the management of business organizations. But I believe that organizational learning is more crucial for non-profit motivated service organizations such as educational institutions because they are more embedded in society and have greater social as well as economic consequences. Educational institutions are dynamic institutions like many others but they are fundamentally different from businesses for whom most of the conventional organizational change and development theories are framed. A developed and tailored theory of organizationa...
14 Pages(3500 words)Report

Esentials of Management: Team-Based Learning

Setting up successful teams is a prerogative of any organization and in the business world of present times; it is very much a need rather than a desire. The businesses have changed so as to create more room for teams than individual working ethos. This has given space to more facilitation within the working environments of teams since they bring combined efforts and usage of more brains than a singular person. The factors that stand important in the wake of successful teams include a commitment towards common goals and a simplistic and solitary objective which must be kept in mind at all times. These factors underline the basis of the teams performing a singular whole than disjointed units within the framework of the organization...
6 Pages(1500 words)Report

Learning and Memory Process

... of the interviewee had gone through the loss of a spouse, a divorce on grounds of infidelity and managed two children singly for 9 years. Yet she had never lost her capacity for happiness. The interviewee appreciates this capacity in the mother and wants to emulate her. Thus, the judgment in the interviewee’s mind with respect to the mother’s attitude towards life shows an understanding of the trauma she had to undergo and the strength she has had to face the situations. The interviewee expresses a desire to look to the future in a positive mental frame. Interviewee X feels that the goodness of the step-father and the positive attitude of the mother in times of emotional adversity have been the major contributory factor towards...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment

The Law on Physical Punishment of Children Fails to give Sufficient Respect to Childrens Rights

Under the English criminal law, several past and current legislations were made in order to protect the children from corporal punishment or becoming a victim of physical abuse. Despite our effort to prevent parents from using physical force in disciplining their children, the British Government remains unconvinced that the law which protects the children from physical punishment is sufficient (Keating, 2008). Physical punishment such as ‘smacking’, ‘slapping’, ‘kicking’, or ‘spanking’ is referring to the act of causing a degree of pain or discomfort to the child. (Niland, 2009, p. 6) With regard to the legal issues behind child protection against physical abuse, this study aims to d...
6 Pages(1500 words)Coursework

Organizational Change is an Opportunity for Organizational Learning

Before we move on to how it is beneficial for everyone, even though it is perceived negatively by a large number of people and is one of their biggest fears, we need to discuss the different kinds of changes and the reason behind them.

An organization can go through a structural change. This can be due to a takeover or a complete change of management. In this type of change, the way of working and many dimensions of business activity is altered. This move is usually towards modernization and staying up with the pace but is too fast and sudden, and thus hard for the stakeholders to adjust with. Then there is a change brought about by the change in the services or goods produced and provided. This is usually a positive ch...
6 Pages(1500 words)Article

Gender Roles in Childrens Books

Brott argues that a large percentage of the writers have mainly focused on male protagonists and the few that have touched on women’s issues do so from a negative point of view (Brott 23). Consequently, men’s reputation has been tarnished to a point where it is difficult to repair. Previous attempts to rectify the transgression have not resulted in significant outcomes for the oppressed gender.
In most societies, the most significant and effective method of passing on values and perceptions rests in reading and telling stories captured in children’s literature. An ordinary experience for many kindergarten children involves listening to stories told from books, most of which are enhanced with illustrations. T...
8 Pages(2000 words)Literature review
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Thesis Proposal on topic Childrens Learning in the Early Years for FREE!

Contact Us