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Accidents and Catastrophes: The Hindenburg Disaster - Article Example

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The paper “Accidents and Catastrophes: The Hindenburg Disaster” seeks to evaluate man-made disasters, which are sometimes credited to the actions or inactions of man which directly contribute to the occurrence of an accident or disaster. Such was the case in the Hindenburg disaster of 1937…
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Accidents and Catastrophes: The Hindenburg Disaster
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Download file to see previous pages The Hindenburg is considered to be the largest airship or dirigible ever built (Rancer, 2007).  It measured 804 feet long and 135 tall with a gas capacity of 7,062,100 cubic feet powered by four 1,100 horsepower diesel engines and held afloat by hydrogen bags (Rancer, 2007).  The airship was named after the President of Germany, Paul von Hindenburg and was designed with the supervision of German airship expert Dr. Hugo Eckener.  Eckener had a fond hope that the airship would ensure regular travel and passenger services across the North Atlantic.  The ship was able to fulfil such goal with its regular transatlantic travels, making 10 flights in 1936 alone (Rancer, 2007).  The Hindenburg was famed for its massive size, for its lavishness and its magnificence, with two decks stretching across the width of the airship and with beautiful interior features like a promenade, lounges, a smoking room, two berths, and a washbasin (Rancer, 2007).  The Hindenburg is considered to be the largest airship or dirigible ever built (Rancer, 2007).  It measured 804 feet long and 135 tall with a gas capacity of 7,062,100 cubic feet powered by four 1,100 horsepower diesel engines and held afloat by hydrogen bags (Rancer, 2007).  The airship was named after the President of Germany, Paul von Hindenburg and was designed with the supervision of German airship expert Dr. Hugo Eckener.  Eckener had a fond hope that the airship would ensure regular travel and passenger services across the North Atlantic.  The ship was able to fulfill such goal with its regular transatlantic travels, making 10 flights in 1936 alone (Rancer, 2007).  The Hindenburg was famed for its massive size, for its lavishness and its magnificence, with two decks stretching across the width of the airship and with beautiful interior features like a promenade, lounges, a smoking room, two berths, and a washbasin (Rancer, 2007).   The Hindenburg made history when, on 6 May 1937, it made its first successful transatlantic travel and cruised triumphantly over Manhattan (Rancer, 2007).  The passengers traveled for 60 hours during the said transatlantic flight.  While approaching the airfield in Lakehurst, New Jersey, it hovered at about 300 feet (Rancer, 2007).  Then, the largest airship in the world took everyone by surprise by bursting into an explosive fire.  Passengers jumped off the airship and various seamen rushed to rescue them.  The landing and the disaster that followed was reported live by Herbert Morrison through a coast-to-coast live radio broadcast (Rancer, 2007).  There were 97 people on board the airship and 35 of these passengers, and one person on the ground perished from the disaster (American Law and Legal Information, 2009).  Much speculation about the cause of the disaster has been bandied about in the time and the years that followed the explosion; the main speculations being that it is either an accident or sabotage.  Other speculations were also investigated and evaluated, but no official causes have been recorded on the disaster.   ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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