StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

The Importance of Nature to Spirituality - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The Romantic Movement was a literary movement that took place starting in the mid- to late-18th century and ended in the 19th century in which the natural world took on new importance in the face of increasingly industrialized atmospheres…
Download full paper File format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER97.7% of users find it useful
The Importance of Nature to Spirituality
Read Text Preview

Extract of sample "The Importance of Nature to Spirituality"

Download file to see previous pages Writers following this tradition sought to find meaning within the natural world that seemed lost within the created world of the humans. However, the way they did this changed depending on their position in time and space. Blake lived from 1757 to 1827 and saw the beginning of the industrial revolution and the growth of the factories. He was aware of the dangers of this growth and saw some of the destruction it brought about, but he lived in England where some of the cities had already had long histories and the erosion of nature didn't seem so dramatic as places such as America where much of the land was still relatively untamed and all of the architecture was new. Wordsworth was an American poet who lived from 1770-1850. The changes that were taking place in America were similar to those happening in Europe, but seemed more dramatic. Both of these poets worked within the same literary movement to emphasize the importance of nature in poems such as "Tyger" and "The World is Too Much With Us" respectively. In poems such as "Tyger," Blake focuses on his own individual way of seeing the world and on the emotions these investigations brought out. This is in keeping with the then emerging Romantic movement which placed a great deal of emphasis on emotional feeling, particularly as it was inspired by nature. This emphasis on emotional feeling is seen in "Tyger" as Blake starts the poem with two exclamatory statements: "Tyger! Tyger!" (1) and infuses them with a strong image in the darkness of the reader's mind: "burning bright / In the forests of the night" (1-2). Most of the poem is written with the intention of creating a sense of awe around the creature that is the focal point of the poem and continues to force the reader's attention on this concept. The tiger's features are described in deadly but beautiful detail, "In what distant deeps or skies / Burnt the fire of thine eyes?" (5-6), in such a way as to constantly focus the attention on its emotional impact. At the same time, these statements are phrased in the form of rhetorical questions that naturally cause the mind to start trying to answer them and thus considering the images more carefully. This same emphasis on the emotions is found in Wordsworth's poem as he opens his poem with a sense, a feeling, that there is something missing in the new modern life of the cities. "The world is too much with us; late and soon, / Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers" (1-2). Before the reader is even certain what it is that Wordsworth is talking about, it is clear that he is feeling a sense of emptiness in daily life and a sense of having little energy or interest in this life. This is also in keeping with his personal times. Although Blake was writing at a time when the industrial revolution was having the same effect on his homeland as Wordsworth, Wordsworth wrote in a place where it seemed the factories and cities were taking over all of the natural beauty of the world, burying it under concrete. It seemed inevitable to most writers of his time and he rightly mourns the loss. He says "We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! / ... / For this, for everything, we are out of tune" (4, 8). Although Blake's creation is filled with the profound emotion of awe, Wordsworth's demonstrates a profound sense of loss. However, both poets discover a sense of natural feeling inherent in the images they produce for their readers and both keep this emotion at the forefront of their poems. Within his poem, Blake focuses on an element of the ‘supernatural’ as something that existed outside the realm of everyday experience, another key characteristic of ...Download file to see next pages Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“The Importance of Nature to Spirituality Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/environmental-studies/1422201-a-common-theme-between
(The Importance of Nature to Spirituality Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words)
https://studentshare.org/environmental-studies/1422201-a-common-theme-between.
“The Importance of Nature to Spirituality Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/environmental-studies/1422201-a-common-theme-between.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF The Importance of Nature to Spirituality

What Are the Effects of Industrial Pollution to Nature in Turkey

It is observed that electroplating and chemical industries are responsible for the generation of a considerable portion of emissions that contain heavy metals, and may affect adversely on human lives and environment. On the other hand, sugar, pharmaceuticals, and textile industries are responsible for the generation of organic pollutants in the atmosphere. Refineries, fertilizers, stone mines, and thermal power units are mainly the causing sectors of contributing a substantial amount of air pollution in the Turkish atmosphere. In specific, sulfur, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide are some of the main pollutants that are generated from the burning of fuels in the abovementioned industries in Turkey. Though vehicular sources also cont...
7 Pages (1750 words) Case Study

Nature of Contrary

There is literature that explores racism in different contexts but most particularly in terms of economics. For example, in the book “Causes of Prejudice,” Vincent N. Parrillo explored this by pointing out that the motives of prejudiced behavior are complicated, and they are not motivated by a single cause but mingled emotional and behavioral human interactions. In “C. P. Ellis,” Studs Terkel remarks upon how racism is developed and how it influences an individual’s feelings and behavior and describes the dissension between groups.

Racial issues have been endemic and ingrained in all aspects of American life, first as custom, then as law and tradition. For at least a century of American his...
6 Pages (1500 words) Essay

Spirituality, Wisdom and the Aesthetic

The final part is an elaboration of personal value and practice that I believe is crucial in infusing spirituality in education. This is the Fostering Approach which is concerned with my perspective on religion, my attitude toward others, me and my family and how they relate to my capabilities and efficacy as an educator.

Description: Ways for spirituality to inform your professional practice; give some examples of ways in which your spirituality could inform your practice as a facilitator of the adult, vocational and workplace learning in one or more environments. Indicate what approaches you might use, what challenges you might expect to encounter and what strategies you might use to overcome these.

Spirituali...
10 Pages (2500 words) Essay

The Importance of Place in a Groups Ethnic Identity

His work spans a broad range of subjects from ethnography among peasants in Algeria, to sociological analysis of nineteenth-century artists and writers, education, language, consumer and cultural tastes, religion, and science in modern French society. (p. 2)
Bourdieu’s major theoretical contributions to sociology are his notion of habitus and its associated concepts of social field and agency. Given the breadth of literature and uses of examples that Bourdieu produced in order to articulate these concepts, there is much room for interpretation of what they meant and how much social agency they afford to individuals. Nonetheless, this paper will explore the habitus, field, and agency in terms of the fluid dynamics of the...
13 Pages (3250 words) Assignment

The Nature of Man: Is Man Good

Augustine will commence. The moderator will be the one to facilitate the discussion for orderly and systematic flow.
Moderator: A pleasant day to all. We are gathered here today to witness the exchange of constructive arguments between two delegates. The first one on my right is a follower of the great political thinker, Aristotle. The one on my left is a passionate believer of St. Augustine. As we all know, Aristotle existed during the Ancient Period while St. Augustine lived in the Medieval Period. Both thinkers have been recognized as the great philosophers who have ever lived.
Before we begin the intellectual exchange of ideas and statements, I will brief you on what is the topic to be touched on. The situation is de...
10 Pages (2500 words) Assignment

The Importance of Employee Empowerment in the Global World

Empowerment is the authority to make decisions within one’s area of operation without having to get approval; from anyone else. Here the operatives are encouraged to use their initiative to do things the way they like. To this end, the employees are given not just authority but resources as well so that they not only take decisions but implement them quickly. This empowerment means giving the employees the authority to make decisions and providing them with financial resources to implement these decisions (Koch & Godden, 1997 11).
Employee participation and empowerment participation means sharing the decision making power with the lower ranks of an organization in an appropriate manner (Lashley & McGoldrick, 199...
9 Pages (2250 words) Assignment

Suicidal Behaviour: Nature, Nurture and Genetic Factors

Various studies have demonstrated the effect of perinatal and early childhood factors on mental health including suicidal behavior. Glover & OConnor (2002) demonstrated the adverse effects of antenatal maternal stress on the psychological development of the offspring. Brown et al (2000) reported that maternal malnutrition during pregnancy results in a higher incidence of affective disorders in adulthood. Thompson et al (2001) demonstrated similar results with low birth weight. In 2004, Mittendorfer- Rutz et al reported that low birth weight and younger maternal age was associated with suicide in the offsprings when they became young adults. In 2006, Riordian et al studied the relationship between perinatal circumstances and su...
8 Pages (2000 words) Term Paper

The Nature of God and Its Relation to Mission

It is God's agent in history, through whom He works by historical processes. Men learn of God and respond to Him in the context of their whole lives as personal, social beings because of the activity of the Christian community. Thesis Mission theology occupies a central role in religious teaching and supported by the main dogmas and principles of theology.

The main texts Genesis 12, Exodus 9 and 19, Numbers 14, several parts in Deuteronomy, Joshua, 1 Samuel, 1 King, 1 Chronicle, Psalm, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Micah, Habbakuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. Jonah's story is considered a missionary book of the Old Testament1. Christians have so understood their role. Jesus' understanding of his role...
8 Pages (2000 words) Case Study

In What Ways Did 20th Century Conflicts Change the Nature of Western Introspection

The 20th century period was marked by several conflicts: World War I, the Holocaust, World War II, the exploitation of Latin American countries, Racial Segregation and the Negro Revolution which spawned the Civil Rights Movement in America and the Feminist Movement.

The Holocaust is admittedly one of the most horrific events in the history of mankind and the impact of the horrors it brought changed the way Ellie Wiesel sees his faith. While Jews are known for their orthodox and unquestioning faith in God, Wiesel’s experiences in the concentration camps of Auschwitz compelled her to question God’s existence. In Night, Wiesel tells of the unspeakable hanging of a young boy who was left dangling for thirty min...
8 Pages (2000 words) Assignment

Importance of ISO 9000 for Plym Yachts

...ISO 9000 Before probing into the issue of describing importance of international organization for standardization, ISO 9000, and then implementing itin the company, Plym Yachts, let’s first get a little introduction of ISO 9000. So starting with ISO 9000, it is that combination of systems that are made for such companies or businesses which have a motivation and enthusiasm for continuous growth and success in any specific competitive market. ISO 9000 is also said as that quality management system, which is combined with three other standards which are ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004. As we know that today’s business world is rapidly changing, it has become extremely important and crucial for any company or business to implement ISO 9000...
6 Pages (1500 words) Case Study
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic The Importance of Nature to Spirituality for FREE!

Contact Us