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Chinese and Japanese Buddhist Calligraphy - Essay Example

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Geographical features, cultural traditions, and religious beliefs have influenced art in in Asian countries. Calligraphy or the art of writing characters, one of the most ubiquitous forms of art, was practiced and revered in the Chinese cultural sphere…
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Chinese and Japanese Buddhist Calligraphy
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Download file to see previous pages Geographical features, cultural traditions, and religious beliefs have influenced art in in Asian countries. Calligraphy or the art of writing characters, one of the most ubiquitous forms of art, was practiced and revered in the Chinese cultural sphere. However, it later got spread across other Asian countries like Japan, Taiwan, Korea, and Vietnam, influencing the sensibilities and styles of different calligraphies. The art of calligraphy encompasses a sense of aesthetic richness that is estimated to have spanned over four millennia. It originated from a region of diverse cultures, traditions, and beliefs, contributing much to the writing art of Asian countries, particularly China and Japan. Building on the tradition of calligraphy, Japanese and Chinese arts developed a distinct style that sets it apart from the Western art and paintings. Both Japanese and Chinese Calligraphy originated and developed primarily from the ancient writing system of China. The discussion compares and contrasts the origins, forms, and inscriptions of Japanese Buddhist Calligraphy and Chinese Buddhist Calligraphy. Thesis: The similarities in Japanese and Chinese Buddhist Calligraphy are primarily based on the Chinese writing system from which they both originated. However, the differences that developed between the calligraphy styles can be attributed to the symbols, inscriptions, language, and the manner in which it is composed. ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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