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Medical ethics - Essay Example

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The Hippocratic Oath is a binding document that dates back to the 5th century that doctors swear to ensure that, they respect the human dignity of the patients they treat and always treat them to their level best. In addition, the doctor should uphold the patients’ privacy and…
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Medical ethics
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Download file to see previous pages All these will be considered in line with the Hippocratic Oath, which declares that doctors should not harm in a bid to preserve human dignity.
The two medical cases considered in this study exhibit advanced level of medication, which begins with experimentation. In the case of Mario, who suffers from mental illness and having undergone over 40 medical examinations and pharmacologist practices, he is left with only one option of advanced medical experimentation. Slater (235) quotes that “He wanted a shot at the ordinary, a lawn he might mow just once a week”. This was the neural implant. From the outset, the medical implant Mario was ready to undergo appears to be risky and unethical due to the nature of the operation and the uncertainty attributed to the whole process. This tells it all that, it is an experiment whose results are unpredictable. Mario puts a tattoo of a baby on the bicep; this implies that, the experiment was too risky that the probability is almost one. If this is the case then the Hippocratic Oath that declares that the doctors should not harm the patients is contravened upon the taking place of this operation. It is ethically wrong for the humans to be used as tools for experiment. In the event that, humans are used for experimentation purposes, the aspect of sanctity of life is disrespected. In essence, the advanced medical procedures like the one Mario underwent, despite its success, undermines the ethical challenges relative to the sanctity of life. We consider the procedure for in-depth understanding.
The procedure that saw Mario gain his normal psychiatric state involved drilling through the bone to make two burr holes on both sides of the skull. Then followed by the placement of the implant with a threaded precision of two 1.27 millimetre wire, through which the iridium electrodes were strung. Slater (238) quotes that “As it is impossible to use animal testing to gauge whether or not ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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