Free

Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The primary objective of this paper is to have a clear understanding about the experiences and perspectives of the Native American Tribes throughout the years including their development and challenges during the stages of the American Revolution. In this context, the discussion…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER94.5% of users find it useful
Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper)
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper)"

Perspectives of Native American Tribes Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 INTRODUCTION 3 MOST DEFINING EVENTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN 3
FACTORS SHAPED EXPERIENCE OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN 4
CONCLUSION 5
REFERENCE 6
INTRODUCTION
The primary objective of this paper is to have a clear understanding about the experiences and perspectives of the Native American Tribes throughout the years including their development and challenges during the stages of the American Revolution. In this context, the discussion of the paper represents clear identification and brief description about the defining events or aspects regarding history for the Native American communities. In addition, the discussion provides the key factors or events that shaped the experience of the Native American.
MOST DEFINING EVENTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN
According to the analytical discussion of Dowd (1993), the experience and perspectives of the Native American Tribes had undergone various stages including development and challenges during the period of American Revolution from the year 1754 to 1781. During the early stage of the revolution, the Indians had experienced numerous obstacles to their continuous survival as a citizen on their own native lands at the early 18th century due to the controlling vied of the British and French. The British and French troops vied their prominent control over the American continent during the mid of eighteenth century whereas, the Native American communities continued seeking for expanding their colonial lands with various settlements. Aftermath the seven years’ of War with the British, the diplomatic situation and decisions of the Indian populations came under a more circumscribed position1.
However, the outburst of the American Revolution in 1754 had imposed major consequences for the Indian colonies in North America, which can be stated as one of the most defining events of the Native Americans. During this stage, adequate understanding about the American Revolution was also advocated as a major contest for the Indian peoples along with their liberty within their own land. In this regard, many of the Indian colonies were sided with a hope of achieving victory with the British, which would stem continuous expansion of the Western countries. In this context, a Free Mason named Joseph Brant along with sister Mary Brant played a crucial role by moving communities away from neutrality policies and into an association with the diplomatic decisions of the British. In this regard, the role of few leaders such as Brant along with his sister and participation of few other front-runners from the Native American tribes can be also regarded as major defining aspects in the history of the Native American and the American Revolution2.
FACTORS SHAPED EXPERIENCE OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN
After being achieved a successful revolution, the creation of newly developed republic had offered a new constitution for the Indian colonists. However, the Indians had faced severe pressure from the land settlers and speculators while the British handed over all of its previously acquired territory to the United States of America during 1783. In the new republic nation, the settlers and speculators were more interested to expand their territory by acquiring colonists’ land of the Indian peoples by force or by making treaties. In this regard, the land acquisition as well as treaties made by the settlers can be stated as few of the major factors shaping experience of the Native Americans3.
CONCLUSION
The study of Dowd (1993) revealed a major understanding about the scenarios prevailed during the early and mid-stages of American Revolution wherein the Native American Tribes had faced numerous challenges. Apart from the defining events such as role of the prominent leaders and significant of building a new republic prior and after the revolution, Dowd had articulated numerous other defining events and factors regarding the challenges faced by the Native American Tribes.
REFERENCE
Dowd, Gregory Evans. "A Spirited Resistance" The North American Indian Struggle for Unity, 1745-1815. Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993. Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) Essay”, n.d.)
Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) Essay. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/english/1675900-perspectives-of-native-american-tribes-response-paper
(Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) Essay)
Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) Essay. https://studentshare.org/english/1675900-perspectives-of-native-american-tribes-response-paper.
“Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/english/1675900-perspectives-of-native-american-tribes-response-paper.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper)

Midterm Paper Topics: Native American Literature

...or kill. The medicinal component of the drum develops more gradually, but becomes increasingly more prominent in their relationship as the novel progresses. The first medicinal response Faye has to the drum manifests in a dream she has. Her twin sister, Netta, who died when they were children, became a frequent visitor to Faye's dreams after her death, but through the years their engagements grew infrequent and finally ceased altogether. For the first time in years, such rendezvous return to their dream-life meeting ground, restoring a dormant relationship. She determines that the drum is responsible for this restoration. Her lost sister shares a common fate with the spirit in the drum, which the novel...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Native American Tribes

...? Native Americans and Outsourcing: Texas Native Americans and Outsourcing: Texas One of the largest groups of Native American Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in the northeastern region of the state of Oregon is reported to be participating in outsourcing. According to Leiber, the firm Cayuse Technologies, an information technology form owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, actually posted “$7.7 million in sales last year” due to rural outsourcing (Leiber, 2010). In fact, the reason why this company has been so successful in getting...
1 Pages(250 words)Case Study

Native American Gods

... with the Indian Americans, as they prefer being called (Ryan 125). This paper is a critical evaluation of the way of life of the Native Americans, precisely their mythology. The Native Americans have their religions and traditions, which they never relinquished even after the European Americans tried to assimilate them to no avail. One major component of these religions is the belief in deities or gods, whom they worship whenever they are faced with different challenges (Malone 23). These are for example the Kokopelli, who is regarded as the god of fertility among North American native communities such as the Hopi and the Zunis. He is referred to as the god of fertility and is perceived as the one who blesses women with children... by a...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Native American Culture

...? Task Background Information Native Americans are the endemic people of North America made up of many tribes and found in Alaska and Hawaii. The migration of Europeans to the Americas in the 15th century led to the building up tension between the two communities and ethnic wars. Furthermore, the Native Americans lost many of their people because they had not acquired immunity against the new diseases brought by the Europeans. American Indians were oppressed by the colonizers and the treaties they made with them were violated and broken (Calloway, 2001). They had a value system in place before being colonized, which consisted of four commandments; respect mother earth, respect the great spirits, respect our fellow man and woman... , and...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Native American Relocation

... Lexington: Eight Revolutionists Died Here In April 19th of 1775, there was a British military’s taking part in the fight against the American Revolution. On this date British soldiers shot at a smaller civilian group at Lexington green and this was called the Battle of Lexington. 1(Murrin, et al 2010 p915) This signifies the point at which the British military killed American civilians, who were revolting against the British colonization. This study is centered on this occurrence and it will seek to vividly analyze how the shooting occurred. There were two small American towns that were highly associated with the American Revolution by the British colonizers. These towns were Concord and Lexington. The leaders of the intensifying... ...
3 Pages(750 words)Research Paper

Native American Societies

...nonexistent. Looking at the American societies, there has been a drastic change in their attitudes from the past. The native tribes of America did not require stringent laws as the environment which was harsh compelled them to carry out their work together (Grounds et al, 298). Consequently, majority of the tribes had limited rules and regulations with the severest punishment that could be meted out being thrown out. Due to the plain environment that was harsh, banishment meant death. Members of the tribe had the responsibility to pray. Marriages too were easily manageable as the requirement was to look after and take care of the women...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Contrasts in Two Native American Tribes

...Contrasts in Two Native American Tribes From even before the United s federal government decided to solve the Indian Problem by creating one large reservation out of the state of Oklahoma, it was common practice to think of all Native Americans as one cultural group united by the simple idea that they all lived on the new common continent before the coming of the Europeans. Looking at it from the perspective of a much-removed future, this idea seems ludicrous, especially when compared with the strong diversity and cultural differences that exist among the people of Europe in much smaller geographical space. Just like the Europeans,...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Native America and Hispanic Cultures in Michigan

...of effective curricula. Here, I believe that good teachers are important in order for the students belonging to ethnic majority to excel in studies. The knowledge of ethnic diversity and understanding of social and cultural differences of the Native Americans and Hispanics as outlined by this paper would allow me as a teacher to be more effective professionally with the acquisition of a wider perspective in addressing the complex academic needs of a diverse body of students. For instance, the absence of written language for Native Americans required a different approach to their instruction. Here, consideration and understanding is...
6 Pages(1500 words)Research Paper

Native American

...The Indian Music: Beyond the Sound of Flutes, Drums, Rattles and Sticks is a Revelation of the Subtle Splendour of the Native American Identity and Experience. [Course] [Professor] [Student Name] [Date] The Indian Music: Beyond the Sound of Flutes, Drums, Rattles and Sticks is a Revelation of the Subtle Splendour of the Native American Identity and Experience. There were roughly five hundred different nations of native peoples during the earliest affirmation of European influx on the coasts of the North American continent. Every nation had distinctive cultural traditions such as in architecture, art, language, music, spiritual beliefs...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Native American

...Native Americans Majority Native Americans usually base their origin in Spanish speaking countries such as Argentina and Canada. The Native Americans constitutes two percent of the entire population. Among these individuals are the Paleo-Indians who migrated into America and spread out into the state and diversifying into hundreds of distinct tribes and nations. I learned that the term Indian was developed by Christopher Columbus in his tour of East Indies, in the Asian states. Usually the Native Indians were hunters and gatherers and majority of them practice agriculture and aquaculture. I have noted...
2 Pages(500 words)Term Paper
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Perspectives of Native American Tribes (Response Paper) for FREE!

Contact Us