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This research article “Linguistic Barriers to Cultural Assimilation in the United States” discusses the levels of linguistic acculturation and the difficulties non-native Arabic speakers will encounter by virtue of being in the United States or Saudi Arabia…
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Linguistic Barriers to Cultural Assimilation in the United States
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Download file to see previous pages This research pertains to the issues facing international students studying at the university level within the continental United States. People from a vast range of countries come to the U.S. in order to pursue their degrees in higher education. When students have been in their country of origin for all their lives and then suddenly move to a new country, they face an extreme culture shock. Therefore, they should be able to make the transition to life in the U.S. Everything is so very new and it takes a long time to get adjusted to the novel stimuli. This research pertains to the issues facing international students studying at the university level within the continental United States. People from a vast range of countries come to the U.S. in order to pursue their degrees in higher education. When students have been in their country of origin for all their lives and then suddenly move to a new country, they face an extreme culture shock. Therefore, they should be able to make the transition to life in the U.S. Everything is so very new and it takes a long time to get adjusted to the novel stimuli.  The major problems that they face after moving to the U.S. are; the new styles of education and classroom behaviors, even peer relations within the classroom, but the origin of these difficulties lies in the difference between all interlocutors which are native and immigrant alike and is of language expression and processing (Thomas, 1988). The hypothesis of this study is interlanguage-linguistic relativity determines cultural assimilation of Muslim women studying in the U.S.  When attending the United States University program, international students undergo some extreme cultural isolation that inhibits their ability to perform within the scholastic society.  The perceptions of them as students and peers include but are not limited to surprise, ridicule, fear, and disgust. These perceptions isolate the international student from the culture within the problems of acculturation that are not only from in their language but also within the “interlanguage” of each student.   ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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