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Effect of Education to Special Children - Research Paper Example

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The paper "Effect of Education to Special Children" highlights that the possibility that children with disabilities could live a normal life is really small. These children were used to have someone by their sides to assist them with their everyday lives, making them dependent on other people.  …
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Effect of Education to Special Children
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Download file to see previous pages Generally and grammatically, inclusion is generally defined as “the state of being included” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary). Though this term is more widely used in the realms of education, the term is also used in the area of disability rights and in the field of taxonomy. However, this paper will only focus on the inclusion regarding education.
According to the Wisconsin Educational Association Council (2007), “inclusion remains a controversial concept in education because it relates to educational and social values, as well as to our sense of individual worth.” Generally, people who have other disabilities have not been able to attend regular classes due to there their physical or mental deficiencies, thus creating an atmosphere of being secluded from the public and suffer from social stress and personal development.
However, as years pass by, laws were created to supervise the possibility of these children having lessons inside a comfortable environment where they could undertake their education. It was the law called LRE (Least Restrictive Environment), which made way for special children to be placed in regular classes instead of having special classes which have been the traditional training for these atypical students.
Several studies served as the backbone of this law and it quickly gained support in the year the 1930s, when it was established, and in the year 1960s, when the rapid growth was formally announced as a breaking away from the traditional segregated self-piece practices (Dunn, 1968; Johnson 1962; Kirk 1964; Quay 1963). It was the concept of LRE that led way to the development of other laws such as IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act) which took care in improving the rights of special children in education so that they could experience a normal lifestyle as far as possible.
The aim of this paper is to explore the various possibilities in which inclusive education for special children can be attained. It will cover the pros and cons of being in inclusive education. It will also feature the outcomes of the surveys conducted about special education programs.  The end result should prove that the inclusion of special need children in education is better for the special need child. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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