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Examining the Challenges Faced By Teachers in the Inclusion of Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in the Mainstream C - Assignment Example

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EXAMINING CHALLENGES FACED BY TEACHERS IN THE INCLUSION OF PUPILS WITH AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDERS (ASD) IN THE MAINSTREAM CLASSROOMS (AND SOME POSSIBLE WAYS FORWARD) Table of Contents Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………
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Examining the Challenges Faced By Teachers in the Inclusion of Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in the Mainstream C
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Download file to see previous pages 3 Causes of Autistic Spectrum Disorders ............................................................................ 4 Inclusion Defined …………………………………………………………………………. 5 Characteristics of children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders …………………………… 5 Expectations of teachers ………………………………………………………………….. 7 Challenges Teachers face in the inclusion ASD pupils in mainstream classrooms .......... 7 Way forward to eliminate the challenges teachers face …………………………………... 12 Conclusion ........................................................................................................................... 15 Introduction Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties (BESD) is a term which describes a range of complex and chronic difficulties experienced by many children and young people. Such people demonstrate features of emotional and behavioural difficulties such as being withdrawn or isolated, disruptive and disturbing, hyperactive, failing to make friends and lacking concentration and mature social skills; and presenting challenging behaviours. It may also cover people with anxiety, who self-harm, have school phobia or depression and those whose behaviour or emotional wellbeing are seen to be deteriorating (DFES, 2001). BESD and learning difficulties Children suffering from BESD face many challenges in learning such as struggling to overcome trust issues, hence fail to make relationships with others, ability to cope with school routines and relationships, failure to reason appropriately. As such, their emotional and behavioural difficulties make them fail to fit well in an environment where they can learn like other normal children. Their failure to fit in the learning environment contravenes with the learning theories advanced by different psychologists such as Bandura, Piaget, Pavlov, Thorndike and Skinner. These theories imply that learning can only take place where there is punishment or reward, observation, imitation, social interaction, attachment to others and pre-existing mental cognition (DCSF, 2007, Midgley, 2008, Cooper, 2008 and Bandura, 1999). Causes of BESD There are several causes of BESD, which are from within or outside the child. Inner causes are very much associated with biological traits within an individual child. However, external causes may include single parenthood, poverty, lack of attachment, parental conflicts, erratic discipline and neglect, (Jull, 2008). Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Defined Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is a lifelong disability that affects how a person communicates with, and relates to, other people. It is a form of BESD which also affects how they make sense of the world around them since it affects ability to understand people, interpret events, communicate, and interact with others. This implies that, just like BESD does, ASD also plays a vital role in the learning of individuals. The term ‘Spectrum’ is used, because, autistic children experience a board band of problems which are grouped into having difficulty with social communication, social interaction and social imagination. For example, a child with autistic spectrum disorders is argumentative, disobedient, annoying, blames others for own mistakes, easily annoyed, resentful, vindictive, likes fighting, destructive, truant, a bully, intimidating, tormenting ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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