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How Teachers use language Strategies in Schools to Control Behaviour Increase Pupil Participation and to Facilitate Learning - Essay Example

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Language strategies will increase the learning process. The research focuses on the use of language as a means of increasing learning in the classroom environment. The research focuses on the importance of incorporating culture and other inputs to the classroom learning environment. …
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How Teachers use language Strategies in Schools to Control Behaviour Increase Pupil Participation and to Facilitate Learning
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Download file to see previous pages This paper stresses that a separate discipline, that centers on prioritising verbal communication, has become an increasingly focus of research. Thus, from a different set of perspectives, the focus of learning language usage is currently being understood as a necessity and not a luxury. Since language is the major symbolic code implemented in the transfer of information from the sender to the receiver, pragmatic teaching strategies could be usefully implemented to the research of communicative processes. It is suggested that pragmatics be explained as the study of the important basic principles of meaningful language use - that is, a research on how verbal communication works and how to enhance the verbal communication activity. The study of how the students and the classroom lecturer maximize language to discover how the teacher and the students converse in oral fashion. The research centers on the use of language as a medium of increasing learning in the classroom environment. Culture and other inputs are important to enhance the classroom learning environment. Indeed, teachers use language strategies in the classroom scenes to control student behavior, increase pupil participation, and to Facilitate Learning.
This paper makes a concluison that learning will increase if the person develops one’s speech and its relation to thought. The child relies on one’s own perception to make sense of objects that appear to them to be unrelated. For example, the child creates one’s subjective relationship between objects and then mistakes one’s egocentric perspective for reality. This falls under incoherent coherence. Thus, the child learns by committing mistakes along the way. The child corrects one’s mistake until the goal or objective is finally achieved. The child includes all inputs, both successful and unsuccessful, are gathered and used to determine the proper way of doing or seeing things. Thus, the teachers must accept mistakes as part of the child’s learning process. The child’s mistakes are used as a stepping stone to generating the proper result in any activity. Social interaction plays a major role in transforming prior knowledge. Thus, specific functions are not given to a person at birth but given as cultural and social patterns. Lev Vygotsky believes that it is human nature for a person to learn best with the cooperation of other human beings. The child’s learning is grounded on one’s reaction to environmental inputs. Thus, the child’s and the teacher’ ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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