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European Enlightenment and Modern Schooling - Essay Example

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The Enlightenment is indicative of the progressive European culture that prevailed in the 18th century. The European citizens who lived during the era of the Enlightenment trusted in the unique abilities of human knowledge, and disregarded the standard conventions and pre-established ideas of the past and it will be discussed in this paper…
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European Enlightenment and Modern Schooling
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Download file to see previous pages These philosophers also felt that if people were left free to use their powers of reason, they would act in ways that would improve their society, as they were inherently good. Accordingly, both human contentment and righteousness needed their liberty from unnecessary restraints, the majority of which were fostered on them by the church as well as the state. The advocates of the Enlightenment's categorical opposition to institutional monarchy and organised religion showed their contempt for the institutions that ruled the masses ruthlessly in the past, as well as a tendency to support utopian restructuring schemes. Most of these philosophers believed keenly in human development through education. They believed that the society would grow perfect if its citizens were free to make use of their powers of reason. The two primary characteristics of the beliefs of the Enlightenment were: Belief in human wisdom’s capacity to discard the conventional practices and the pre-established establishments Ideas the development of useful, functional information as the power to manage and preserve nature. Education in the Past In the past, education in Europe was always influenced by the competition and conflict between different religious denominations. The Catholic Counter-Reformation and the protestant reformation are cases that verify this reality in a better manner. Religious principles supported the education of a chosen few during the middle ages. During the Renaissance, however, additional reasons were included as a means of educating more citizens. For instance, the development of the economies of cities in Italy in the fifteenth century required that many children receive instruction regarding secular life. Previously, the...
This essay approves that The characteristics of research studies are quite similar to those of the disputation. The reporting is conducted in public, and the laws governing the examinations state that the student has to have conducted the research or at least took part in it. The research standards for the delivery of the work are also objective as well as explicit.
This report makes a conclusion that the principles of the Enlightenment came from belief in the abilities of human reason to resolve, by means of scientific advancement and education, the difficulties facing humanity and, thereby, change society. In the 18th century, the advocates of the Enlightenment fought against the established institutions in British society to get their ideas to be recognised. A large number were incarcerated, while others were hindered by government suppression activities, as well as by the attacks from the church. However, by the 1770s, second-generation ideals were getting government funds and taking control of recognised intellectual institutions of education. The massive increase in the production of books as well as newspapers ensured an extensive diffusion of the Enlightenment concepts. Philosophical dissertations and methodical experiments grew to be fashionable in all classes of society, including elements of the clergy and the nobility. A majority of European monarchs also began to tout definite ideas, or at least the expressions of the Enlightenment. They were not genuine, knowing that the Enlightenment would spell the beginning of the end for them. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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