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Teaching Reflection - Essay Example

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According to Dingrando (2002, p.14), teaching chemistry puts an emphasis on a variety of approaches geared towards identifying goals of education that cover intended targets in the personal, intellectual, and social domains. …
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Teaching Reflection
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Download file to see previous pages My work placement at *****, gave me an invaluable insights into the relevant approach to teaching chemistry. The experience was extremely helpful in understanding the various methods used by teachers in helping their students understand the subject with an in-depth comprehension of concepts. My two-week placement entailed working hand in hand with the chemistry teachers in the school. I was able to observe their methods of teaching the science and I assisted in a number of areas to enable myself be more acquainted with what dissemination of scientific knowledge to secondary school students is all about. In my first week of my work placement, I was able to take charge of some class activities, whereby I was assigned a duty of assisting students with difficulties in chemistry (Ellison 2008, p.46). My interactions with the teachers offered me an opportunity to learn about developing a lesson plan that is suitable for teaching science and chemistry in precision. The plan is an extremely important step, if the teacher wants to remain relevant in the classroom. Here, an instructor starts by identifying what is going to be covered in every particular lesson. Then the objectives of the lessons are determined, so that a teacher can identify the specific behaviours and capabilities that a student should exhibit after every lesson is covered (Sanderson 2002, p.23). Most of the teacher in the school used descriptive objectives. This provides a better platform for the educator to get great feedback on his/her teaching effectiveness, and students’ progress as well. Taking time to determine what the learners already know about the subject matter would enhance the overall success of completion of a lesson. Chemistry is relatively practical lessons, and having this in mind, teachers ensured that the necessary material and apparatus necessary to be used in a particular lesson are identified in the lesson plan in an attempt to accomplish the objectives described. These materials are highly useful in facilitating the learning process. Thus, as observed, a lesson plan increases the efficiency of teaching practice and the quality of the students’ learning time (Dorin 2002, p.29). Varieties of teaching approaches were also evident in the school learning processes. Here I actively participated in facilitating group discussions. These activities tend to generate interest in the topic under study and students are able to learn from friends. The teachers were also involved in helping out in explaining the concepts that were beyond the then understanding of the students. The teachers also had a variety of methods that they used to facilitate learning process. They give out assignments that required further reading and research on the subject matter. The main theme here was, “thinking further”. Learning partnership among student also seemed to develop a longer term learning culture among themselves (Gabel 2004, p.31). As observed, this approach helped weak students to learn continuously from their peers and consequently gaining much more understanding on chemistry. I also learnt that the teachers generally applied the three learning theories in identifying a suitable methods and media of teaching in the school. These include the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains. The psychomotor domain is generally skill based. Here the student tends to produce a product. It entails practical instructional levels that include imitation, practice, as well as habit. The psychomotor domain steep in a demonstration, delivery as well as the first level, imitation, which simply is a return of demonstrations that are under the control of the instructor. Additionally, the practice level is a proficiency building experience, which is ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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