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Occupy Wall Street Movement - Admission/Application Essay Example

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Occupy Wall Street Movement Introduction Occupy Wall Street movement is considered to be a continuous protest movement that commenced in the year 2011 particularly in a park named Zuccotti Park situated in New York, United States. The protests associated with this movement normally emphasizes upon various issues which include economic impartiality, wealth inequality and corruption in the prevalent financial system…
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Download file to see previous pages The movement has been inspired from the recent protests which occurred in the Middle East, Europe as well as in Spain. It has been observed that the initial day of the beginning of the protest linked with the movement drew extensive number of activists to Wall Street which stood at approximately 1,000 protestors (Anderson School of Management, 2011). In this paper, the moral as well as the economic implications which have been involved with the Occupy Wall Street movement will be taken into concern. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the implications against various ethical perspectives which include Utilitarian, Kantian and Virtue will be portrayed in order to determine the movement in the discussion. Discussion The moral implications which are involved with the Occupy Wall Street movement comprise several significant aspects which include the thought of individual responsibility rather than moral responsibility and pre-eminence of self-interest. In relation to the moral implications, the movement explained the aspect of hierarchical authority which is principally based upon wealth or other variety of hierarchical power. According to the protestors of the movement, the role of the government is to defend as well as to empower all citizens in all relevant aspects which include public related infrastructure, education, health, transportation, enforcement of laws, trade policies, public lands and resources. An unbalanced wealth distribution will ultimately create inequality amid the individuals which poses significant impact upon the economy of a nation. On the basis of the aforementioned grounds, it can be stated that the movement bears a progressive vision which is primarily based on moral principles. The moral issues in relation to the movement include democracy, global citizenship, nature and offering of strong wages to the workers belonging to the nation. From the perspective of the moral issue i.e. democracy, the protestors of the movement raised a strong voice in favor of requiring publicly supported elections with 99% democracy. In terms of offering strong wages to every worker belonging to the US, the protestors laid much emphasis upon the fact that the workers of the nation should be provided with strong wages through which their living standard and the economy of the nation can be raised considerably. From the viewpoint of the aspect of global citizenship, the protestors linked with the movement also raised a strong voice regarding the government’s role in order to transform every citizen of the nation to a global one. Finally, the protestors also raised the issue against the government about destroying the nature which is happening through the facet of global warming along with other several forms of environmental destruction such as deep-water drilling and fracking among others (Lakoff, 2011). The economic implications of the movement lie in the fact of financial inequality in the developed business world which has been focused upon various significant aspects which consist of deficits, debts and budget austerity. According to the protestors belonging to the movement, the stakes are running quite high as well as deep in the nation. Moreover, the factors of unemployment, income stagnation and spending cuts are increasing rapidly which are ultimately ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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