StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Positive and negative impact of international institutions on developing countries - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Name: Tutor: Course: Date: University: Positive and negative impact of international institutions on developing countries Introduction International organizations play a remarkable role in enhancing various forms of development in developing countries. International institutions such as World Bank and United Nations Conference on Trade and Development have made significant contributions, which aim at alleviating poverty and encouraging development…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER92.7% of users find it useful
Positive and negative impact of international institutions on developing countries
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Positive and negative impact of international institutions on developing countries"

Download file to see previous pages Therefore, the paper will focus on how these institutions have contributed to development and how their influence has had negative impacts on developing nations. An overview of operations of international institution in Developing Countries Since the advent of globalisation, international organisations have increased their operations in developing countries. International trade has spread all over the world at a faster rate than experienced before this phenomenon. In their quest for economic, as well as social progress in the last four to five decades, developing countries have embraced policies that promote international trade. Consequently, their share of exports has increased to one third from one fourth during the 1960’s. The World Bank and UNCTAD have taken part in trade activities in regions such as Central America, East Asia, and Africa. The formation of these institutions aimed at enhancing global trade. With development loans offered by these institutions, developing nations have managed to carry out development projects (Young, 2000). While taking part in development activities, in developing countries, international institutions contend that an enabling international environment is of paramount importance. They argue that such an environment enables developing countries and other economies under transition to have successful integration into the economy of the world. International trade also allows developing countries to develop reliable capabilities of supply, which will be in line with the market demands, improve networking, promote development and transfer of technology, as well as increase productivity. International institutions emphasize that developing nations should promote growth and development by instituting policies, which will encourage international trade. As such, governments of developing countries should provide adequate resources, improve the capacity of institutions, enhance technological capacity, and improve infrastructure. Positive and negative impact of World Bank and UNCTAD on developing countries The World Bank came to being after the end of the Second World War; the political climate present during the time of its formation was different from the current political climate in the world of today. The institutional structures of this organization were incorporated in Bretton Woods, at an international conference held in New Hampshire. The initial purpose of forming the World Bank was to provide aid in terms of loans to developing nations. The main targets included the countries facing a crisis of balance of payment deficits and immense difficulties in settling debts (Wantchekon 2002, p. 59). Originally, the purpose and focus of World Bank aimed at lending money to European government of the West in order to assist them in rebuilding their countries as a result of the war. However, the attention of the World Bank later focussed on giving loans to developing countries for development purposes. UNCTAD came into being during the early years of 1960s. During the early 1960s, there grew concerns about the place of developing countries in international trade. This made most of these nations to advocate for the convening of a conference devoted to dealing with problems ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Positive and negative impact of international institutions on Essay”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/business/1400621-positive-and-negative-impact-of-international
(Positive and Negative Impact of International Institutions on Essay)
https://studentshare.org/business/1400621-positive-and-negative-impact-of-international.
“Positive and Negative Impact of International Institutions on Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/business/1400621-positive-and-negative-impact-of-international.
  • Cited: 1 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Positive and negative impact of international institutions on developing countries

The Universality in International Human Rights

The continuous changes in the international area have created the necessity for a flexible legal framework that could achieve the above target. However, in order for such a task to be successful, there must be a specific theoretical ‘vehicle’ that could present with accuracy both the existing situation, the problems under examination and the desired result. Towards that direction, the creation of the ‘international human rights’ sector gave to the nations the chance to organize their internal legal rules and their behaviour in the global area in the basis of a specific set of principles recognized by the international community as binding and directly applied in the interior of the participated countries. I...
10 Pages(2500 words)Assignment

The impact of Plant Disease on New Zealand

Transmission of PMTV occurs through inoculation of sap in 26 species belonging to Solanaceae or Chenopodiaceae and to Tetragonia expansa and also through grafting (A. Reavy., W. Kashiwazaki., & Barker,1995 ). In some cases, PMTV is known to be transmitted by mechanical inoculation also.

Since PMTV is vectored only through S.subterranea the infection of plants with PMTV depends on the life cycle of S.subterranea which takes about 10-14 days. The life cycle of S.subterranean takes place in 2 phases: Phase I) This is the primary stage of the life cycle initiated with the germination of resting spores known as sporangiosori or cystosori persisting in the soil as spore balls with thick cell walls into zoosporangia. These...
6 Pages(1500 words)Report

The Role Played by Cultural Difference in International Politics

The discourse of multiculturalism is inconsistent. To its advantages belongs preservation of cultural pluralism, recognition, and protection of the diverse minority, refusal from xenophobia, chauvinism, and racial prejudices. Lacks are shown in ethnisation of social relations, the institutionalization of cultural distinctions, ignoring the liberal principle of priority of the rights of an individual.

The culture of any nation, defining its spiritual uniqueness, expressing its creative power and abilities, simultaneously is a property of all mankind. “According to official multiculturalism, no individual is forced to retain his or her culture, but all cultures are granted a universal right to celebrate and even to...
9 Pages(2250 words)Essay

The Impact of Comic Books on Boys and Girls

Marvel comics made the first important steps in the particular sector – at the decade of 1960s, the firm presented through its books a series of innovative stories that have until today a significant influence to the public - the characters and the appearance of the stars of Marvel and the other firms that govern the specific sector since the decade of 1960 will be analyzed in the sections that follow. The current paper refers to a specific aspect of the particular sector (comic books): the perspectives of the firms operating in this industry on boys and girls; special reference is made to the change of these perspectives from the 1960s until today. Marvel is used – among other firms – as indicative example of th...
15 Pages(3750 words)Research Proposal

International Trade Theory

 Further to this, it is also believed that international trade can bring substantial economic welfare to the countries however still most of the countries do not view it as a favorable thing. Despite having a very promising and bright outlook, international trade has been largely viewed with suspension and it is because of this that governments impose barriers to restrict international trade. There can be many reasons behind this act of imposing restrictions or blocking international trade however there are also benefits on the other side too.

International trade has driven the attention of many of the brilliant minds in economics therefore the origins of the economic theory on international trade owe much to the c...
6 Pages(1500 words)Case Study

The Implications of International M&A

When an international merger or acquisition occurs when the company’s productivity improves through learning from partner firms or obtaining benefits from partners’ complementary assets. On the other hand, international M&A requires companies to restructure so that there could be overheads of coordinating corporate culture and the working environment.
In addition, even if there are no profits from international M&A, corporate managers might have a motivation to get hold of other companies if they have ambitions like “empire building” (Jensen (1986)). In these cases, a productivity loss may be found. Theoretically, it is difficult to determine whether productivity profits from international M&am...
11 Pages(2750 words)Assignment

Globalization and International Business: Starbucks Corporation

The Small Business Encyclopedia defines globalization as the process by which the economies of countries around the world become increasingly integrated over time. This integration occurs as technological advances expedite the trade of goods and services, the flow of capital, and the migration of people across international borders (globalization, Answers.com).
The shreds of evidence of globalization are all around us. For example, Hill (2005) cites an example of an American driving a car designed and produced in Germany that was assembled in Mexico from components made in Japan fabricated by Korean steel and Malaysian rubber. The car is filled with gasoline from oil pumped from off the coast of Africa, at a service station o...
12 Pages(3000 words)Case Study

Developing Professional Practice Portfolio

I work in a very busy outpatient department that includes many different clinic settings.  Most recently, the oral surgery, maxillo-facial surgery, and plastic surgery departments have become part of our directorate as a result of reorganization with in the trust. Although I have always considered myself to be a competent, confident professional, I found working in this reorganized department very stressful. The unit seemed to be very poorly organized with staff shortages and inadequate facilities. I was most surprised to discover that there were no documented records for patient wound care services provided in the clinic. I found this latter situation to be unacceptable from a professional standpoint. Some of the patients in...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Impact of Motivational Factors upon Employees at Bank AlFalah and Standard Chartered Pakistan

The impacts of these policies upon the employees of the banks will be studied with the help of the responses of the employees of both of the banks. The proposed research study will present the case studies of these two banks by employing a qualitative research approach. The data and information for the study will be collected through secondary and primary resources i.e. through literature review and in-depth interviews of the employees of both the banks. The study will help in the identification of the major strengths and weaknesses present in the motivational policies of these banks and will allow proposing the formulation of improved policies.

Motivation basically refers to satisfying one’s needs through differe...
14 Pages(3500 words)Research Proposal

International Affairs v. Liberalism

As a matter of fact, Hoffman’s statement that “international affairs is the nemesis of liberalism” has a grain of truth in it and this is especially so after the 9/11 incident.
There are two schools of thought or perspectives that are used to view international affairs: liberalism and realism. The study of these two perspectives is significant to the idea posed by Stanley Hoffman because they determine the reasons why international affairs, according to him, does not only see eye-to-eye with liberalism but seems to stand on the opposing side of it.
Liberalism can be defined as having four elements: citizens; the legislature; property rights, and; a market-driven economy (Dunne 186). Realism, on the othe...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Positive and negative impact of international institutions on developing countries for FREE!

Contact Us