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Do native peoples today invent their tradition - Essay Example

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Appreciating Human Diversity Name Professor Anthropology Date Do native peoples today invent their tradition? Every society is endowed with a history, either hidden or utterly conspicuous in its norms. At the base of every community, are the native aborigines…
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Download file to see previous pages Today, the native influence is gradually facing assimilation due to the impacts of migration, settlements, and expansion of immigrants into new lands. These immigrants come with new values and social structures that either absorb or consume the existing traditions. Some states have become wiser, preserved these natives in their rightful places, and netted mass revenue in return. The history of these original natives is very resourceful and traces its roots to the precincts of civilization. Contrastingly, today many communities have risen. The sprouting communities tend to emerge and dynamically evolve to become different from the ancient eras. Their traditions are not directly similar to the archaic eras. They have new norms and values that could sound profane to the aborigines. It is not authentic where these new traces of tradition arise. This paper attempts to discuss whether the natives today invent their traditions. The plot development takes into consideration case studies and analogies from different cultures around the world. Special reference falls on the current American native community. The initial part shall outline points that contradict this premise. The second section shall then garner support for the premise before offering a conclusive standpoint in the stale mate. Tradition has always found its roots in oral tradition of a community. The community is a channel of culture transfer across generations. Consequently, it is inappropriate to assume that these natives invent their cultures. These cultures find their way to the present times through the vehicle of oral tradition that passes this values and norms to the preceding generations. In this sense, the traditions that appear to have ancient roots still find their stronghold in the society today. In fact, a few modifications take place in them, but the key intents always remain unchanged. The Native American perspective helps to unravel this myth. According Kattok (2010), the markers of traditional Native American identity prevail to date. She asserts that “indigenes” injects itself into the mainstream of current native inhabitants of the community and later stand as true. The essence of oral tradition stands out as influential in the presence of long standing traditions that still stand in the present. A good illustration is the spiritual viewpoint shared by several generations over time. The evolving community has often shown similar appreciation of religious beliefs despite the time and age manifested. The Native American philosophy advocates that spirituality is supreme and directional. The natives, therefore, almost universally observe the earth as a womanly figure. In this respect, this notion passes on to the upcoming generation. It is no wonder several people regard the earth as “her…” Additionally, the natives also view many environmental products as endowments from a higher being. kattok (2010) supports this view when he says that man was created to complement the other creations. Secondly, the colonial times across the world history bear a lot of explanation to the origin and invention of a variety of cultures. The colonization era among several affected states was a time of reckoning. The colonizing powers established their cultures that they deemed as superior. In most instances, the natives never got the chance to contribute to the creation of the emergent culture. In the ancient American tradition, the immigrants’ influx and the British invasion of the 17th century saw the emergence of various ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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