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The economic impacts of tourism on Brighton - Dissertation Example

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The Economic Impacts of Tourism on Brighton [University Name] 2013 Contents 1.INTRODUCTION 3 1.1 Research Aims & Objectives 4 1.2 Rationale of this Study 4 1.3 Overview of the Dissertation 5 2.LITERATURE REVIEW 6 2.1 Decline of Tourism at the Seaside Resorts 7 2.1.1 Brighton as a Seaside Resort 9 2.2 Steps taken by the Government to Promote Tourism in Brighton 12 2.3 Tourist Industry’s Future Trends and Challenges Ahead 13 2.4 Theoretical Framework 13 3.RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 16 3.1 Research Philosophy 16 3.2 Research Design 17 3.3 Types of Data and Data Collection Tool 17 3.4 Sampling Size 18 3.5 Data Analysis and Presentation Techniques 18 3.6 Research Limitations 19 3.7 Ethi…
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The economic impacts of tourism on Brighton
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Download file to see previous pages INTRODUCTION Tourism has always been a great source of economic activities. It is one of the largest and constantly evolving industries of the world where growth and development rate is high. Many countries thrive over tourism and it is stated to provide around ten percent of the income of the world with ten percent of the world’s workforce associated with it (Stynes 1997). The social and economic impact of tourism is significant as it leads to the developments of infrastructure, creates job opportunities and brings in an inflow of foreign currency (Stynes 1997). Tourism is also instrumental in preserving the local arts and handicrafts as tourists buy various articles such as pottery, carpets, wood carvings, metal carvings and other types of handicrafts as souvenirs (Mirbabayev & Shagazatova n.d.). UK is one of the European countries that attract tourists from all over the world. UK offers diversity in tourism such as education tourism, medical tourism, urban tourism, rural tourism as well as a quiet holiday at a countryside. Brighton is a beautiful and busy tourist spot in UK that attracts eight million tourists annually (World Guides 2013). From a small fishing village in the 13th century it has emerged as one of the popular tourist destination in England. It is one of the top five popular cities of UK and also comes within the top ten overseas tourist destinations in UK (VisitBrighton n.d.). Because of its quaint combination of history and modern traditions, the place is known as “London by the Sea”. There has been extensive research on tourism however Brighton is not particularly discussed with reference to tourism. This research aims to study how tourism helps Brighton’s economy. With main aim to explore how important tourism is for Brighton and the money tourism attracts from various tourist activities, this study also evaluates the impact of tourism on local economy in Brighton and how tourism helps local businesses in Brighton. 1.1 Research Aims & Objectives The main aim of this study is to explore how important tourism is to UK economy and how much money tourist attractions and activities in Brighton attracts to UK. Along with achieving this aim, this stud also aims to explore following. To explore how tourism helps Brighton and how tourism in Brighton contributes to UK economy. To critically evaluate the impact of tourism on local economy in Brighton while studying its negative and positive aspects. To find out how tourism helps local businesses in Brighton. To explore the reasons tourists visit Brighton. 1.2 Rationale of this Study The reason for the selection of this topic is to explore this area in detail because research on tourism in general is done on vast level; however, tourism in Brighton is studied less. Besides, economy is important for every country and tourism is a business that contributes significantly to the economy. Every ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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