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Examine the history of Canadian Broadcasting Corperation - Essay Example

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An Examination of the History of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Outline Introduction The History of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Conclusion Introduction A critical examination of the history of Canada’s national public broadcaster, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), reveals that despite the fact that CBC can be described as an institution with great achievements worldwide contributing to such being the 20ths century’s most significant national cultural organization, it has not built up a bigger commitment to its very own history…
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Examine the history of Canadian Broadcasting Corperation
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Download file to see previous pages For the reason that CBC/ Radio – Canada has been at the center of Canada’s cultural, political, social as well as economic life, without a doubt, CBC/ Radio – Canada has played a significant part in the whole development of the broadcasting system in Canada (Schellenberger 3). Apart from that, CBC is at the center of the lives of linguistically and culturally diverse Canadian audience because it has reached out very huge geographical locations, brought them nearer together and granted them to share their one of its kind experience of North America (Schellenberger 3). As Canada’s public broadcaster, this media has functioned a task of promoting and increasing awareness of Canadian values (CBC/ Radio – Canada ii). Indeed, it has sustained the highest standards of excellence as a broadcaster. Nonetheless, despite the role played by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the history of Canada, the history of CBC is threatened by financial crisis. With the given scheme of transitioning over – the – air television signals from analog to digital, the Canadian Radio – Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has imposed a mandatory transition timeline of 4 years of switching over – the – air television signals from analog to digital (Potts). On the one hand, the funds of CBC to support this plan are not sufficient given the reduced allocated funding provided by the federal government. In this regard, the focus of this essay aims at a critical examination of the history of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The necessity to analyze the history of CBC is because of the significant role it has served in Canada. Through looking at CBC through a socio – historical perspective, the situation of CBC today can be further understood. The History of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation The origins of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation have started since 1929 (Schellenberger 5). This is because, then, majority of the Canadians listened to the mainstream radio broadcasts of United States. In this regard, the Aird Commission feared that instead of Canadian ideals and viewpoints, it’s the American’s that would tend to inculcate to the young people (Schellenberger 5). The main objective of setting up a CBC is through public ownership of broadcasting, Canada could be culturally independent from United States. As a result of the Canadian Broadcasting Act as approved the Parliament to replace the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Act, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was first established on November 2, 1936 (Potts). CBC has served to operate as national broadcaster that is truly of Canadian content. Its first elected chairman, Leonard W. Brockington of Winnipeg aimed for CBC to have the best possible programming and to be heard by almost every Canadian (Potts). Prior to its establishment, in 1937, the CBC network began its daily radio operation. In 1939, it had extended to a basic network of 34 stations in which both were private and public. The early 1940s was marked by the demand developed among listeners, advertisers and stations for an alternative ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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