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Buddhism - Annotated Bibliography Example

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Buddhism involves a methodology and a practice of training the minds on significant of cultivating good deeds, wisdom, and concentration. The teaching emphasizes on ensuring that human actions and spoken words should remain…
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Buddhism Buddhism . Buddhism entails a religious teachings and practice. Buddhism involves a methodology and a practice of training the minds on significant of cultivating good deeds, wisdom, and concentration. The teaching emphasizes on ensuring that human actions and spoken words should remain non-harmful to others. In other words, Buddha’s teaching focuses at bringing to an end of human suffering via promotion of human virtues. The aims of Buddha’s practitioners were not to bring unity but rather to ensure that there is purity of minds via meditation up to a point where human minds can be liberated from desires, dilutions, and aversion. In addition, Buddha’s do not believe that in life there is something like fate and urges that human beings are the drivers of their own lives whereby, every human being has the capacity and ability to liberate themselves from any suffering that one might be going through.
http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/5minbud.htm
The nature of self entails the act of awareness or having some consciousness. However, the nature of the self is not specific to awareness of any kind but it tends to be very general. The nature of the self may involve certain things such: feelings, imagination, intuition, memory, thoughts to mention just but a few. This means that the preposition of awareness may not properly define the content of the nature of the self because awareness tends to have some limitation. In addition, the nature of the self is not limited to anything just the same way that human being have unlimited desire in life. For example, human being are never satisfied with what they have, they always want to work hard to earn more money to meet their unlimited desires, in the same way that the nature of the self is not limited to consciousness or awareness as discussed. The main aim of self is the realization of individual personal identity. The Sri Raman asserted that the nature of self entails a fabrication of mind whereby, self awareness may involve realization of oneself .
http://www.pbs.org/edens/thailand/buddhism.htm
Philosophers Aristotle and Plato tried to substantiate whether the soul, minds and the body are separable from each other and whether the soul is immortal upon human death. Whereby, Aristotle assertions supported the eastern religion of Buddhism that the nature of the self as an activity and that self exist within human being but it is separable from the human body. Aristotle added that self when a person dies, both the body and the self perish. He further substantiated his assertion using a knife as an example. The knife was considered as the body that has a soul whereby, during the process of cutting an object, the soul executes the task of cutting. When the knife is destroyed the act of cutting also seizes. Aristotle used this example to imply that the act of cutting is inseparable from a knife because if the knife is destroyed the act of cutting stop immediately and therefore, the soul (the self) cannot be separated from the body upon death, they both die together . In addition, Avicenna the writer of an Article known as ‘Floating Man’ thought of an experiment to explain his assertions that self awareness is independent of self (soul), whereby, if a man is suspended in the air and is isolated from being into contact with everything he would still have some consciousness of self awareness. Therefore, the nature of self is independent to the body .
Works Cited
Cobben, K. and Dave, P. (2009)The Nature of the Self: Recognition in the Form of Right and Morality. Berlin: W. de Gruyter.
Kalupahana and David J. Buddhist Philosophy: A Historical Analysis. Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1976. Print.
http://www.pbs.org/edens/thailand/buddhism.htm
http://www.vipassanadhura.com/buddhism.htm>.
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