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World Religions: Iglesia ni Kristo - Assignment Example

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The author describes the Iglesia ni Kristo religion which is a power not only in the Philippines but also abroad. It attracted a great number of followers due to its contemporary teachings. However, it is a sad fact that it has to collide with other religions which caused tension among the people. …
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Download file to see previous pages Marriage of non-Filipinos to those belonging in Iglesia families is just one of the examples of how those comprising the minority of the Iglesia population have been involved in the religion (Catholic Answers, 2004). Despite the widespread estimate of the number of the constituents (which is between three million and ten million including those outside the Philippines), the Iglesia conceals their real population. It has a larger population than the more known Jehovah’s Witnesses, which also assert they are being the genuine Church of Christ (Catholic Answers, 2004).

Indeed, unlike most of the other cults which have Western origins, Iglesia ni Kristo (INC) or the Church of Christ has its roots from the Philippines with Encyclopedia Britannica (2007) describing it as indigenous. Historically, it was a small church founded by Felix Manalo on July 27, 1914 (Elesterio, 1988). Thus, he was considered by his followers as the messenger of God.

After the fast expansion in 1945, the number of members reached the 600,000 marks by the end of the 20th century (“Iglesia ni Kristo”, 2007). This has also led to the building of chapels throughout the country and to their being a well-heeled federal religious organization.

However, the foundation of INC was not an easy task; it was a great struggle for Manalo. Yet, Harper (2001) noted that one thing is certain: preliminary association with the Bible pushed him to impugn what has been taught to him regarding religion and God in the Roman Catholic Church. According to her research, Manalo had joined other religious groups before he finally established INC. At the age of 18, it was found out that he joined the Methodist Episcopal Church where he trained about the Bible and become a lay preacher.  ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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