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Religious Liberty - Essay Example

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This essay analyzes that the protection of human rights is not confined to one specific region or field only; rather, it is equally applicable to domestic, professional, financial and religious areas. The constitution offers the US citizens unconditional and unflinching protection of human rights…
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Religious Liberty
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Download file to see previous pages It is, therefore, the very first amendment, introduced in the constitution in 1791, provides an absolute and unrestricted religious freedom to the masses, where the followers of all faiths are declared free to perform their religious practices without any prohibition, interference or restrictions from the state or government altogether. The first amendment in the US constitution states: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble...” Runquist (2007) observes that the first clause prohibits the government from establishing a religion (including preferring one religion over another or over no religion). The second clause guarantees the free exercise of religion. Father of the US nation, George Washington, hand-wrote in his own personal prayer book that it is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible (Judiciary House, 2011). Hence, the Americans are free to attend churches, mosques, synagogues, and temples without any checks on their religious performances from the state as well as from their religious opponents and rival communities. Religion can rightly be stated as one of the most fundamental elements of human life. Though it is a diversified subject, and thousands of faiths exist in the world, yet believe in the supernatural and metaphysical powers is common in all cultures of the world. An overwhelming majority of the people at global scale maintain that some Supreme Being certainly exists in the universe, which could solve all their difficulties and problems, and can protect them from the disasters and calamities they themselves are unable to combat with. Consequently, people develop emotional attachments with the deity they adore and do not allow any type of hindrance or obstacle that could stop them from displaying their sincere compliance, reverence, and worship to the deity. History is replete with the examples of horrible wars fought in the name of religion, which resulted in heavy and irreparable losses in men and material. Adherence to the religious teachings is not confined to one single community or social class only; rather, it is equally popular among the rich and poor and the strong and weak. It is, therefore, George W. Bush (2001) had declared the war of terrorism as the continuity of the crusade wars fought by the Christians against the Muslims in the medieval times. Judis (2005) submits to state that in putting forth his foreign policy, George W. Bush speaks of the United States having a calling or mission that has come from the Maker of Heaven. Thus, the religion is central in the life of the American people; it is therefore 79% of the population openly declares it as the follower of various Christian factions. Keeping in view all these facts and realities, along with the mental condition and sentiment of the people behind them, the founder-leaders of the USA decided to offer unrestricted religious liberty to the masses in order to avoid and escape any unpleasant state of affairs for the future years to come. I ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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