Correlation between Childhood IQ and Adult Mental Disorders - Term Paper Example

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This research paper attempts to address the following questions: Is there a correlation between low childhood IQ and the prevalence of adult mental disorders?; and  Are children with lower IQ less able to cope with emotional and behavioral issues?…
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Correlation between Childhood IQ and Adult Mental Disorders
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Download file to see previous pages In reviewing previous studies on the current topic, a study by Koenen, et.al., (2009) sought to test the hypothesis that low childhood IQ is related to a higher risk and severity of adult mental disorders. The study covered about 1,037 respondents from Dunedin, New Zealand of the 1972-1973 birth cohort and who were followed up to the time they turned 32. Their IQ was assessed at ages 7, 9, and 11; and their mental health was evaluated at ages 18, 21, 26, and 32 (Koenen, et.al., 2009). In the course of the study, the authors were able to establish that lower childhood IQ was very much associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, adult depression, and adult anxiety. For those with higher childhood IQ, an association with adult mania was seen (Koenen, et.al., 2009).
In a similar study by Batty, Mortensen, and Osler (2005), the authors sought to study childhood IQ in relation to later psychiatric disorders. In this study, the childhood scores of 7022 Danish males were evaluated in relation to psychiatric hospital discharge records in adulthood (Batty, Mortensen, & Osler, 2005). Their study established that there was an inverse relationship between low IQ scores and the risk of the adult psychiatric disorder. In effect, the study revealed that the lower the IQ of the child was, the higher his risk of later developing a psychiatric illness. In yet another study, this time by Ferguson, Horwood, and Ridder (2005), the authors set out to examine the extent to which IQ in middle childhood was an indication of future outcomes. IQs of children were gathered at 8-9 years of age and the study covered 1265 New Zealand children over the span of 25 years. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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