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Mental Illness - Case Study Example

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The case study of mental illness involves the child who was suffering from Asperger Disorder (AD) which is also a disorder known as Asperger syndrome. Asperger disorder is one of the autism spectrum disorders, which are characterized by repetitive behaviors and social interaction difficulties (Amaral, Dawson and Geschwind, 2011). …
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Download file to see previous pages AD differs from other autism spectrum disorders because there is absence of speech or language delays and symptoms are less severe in asperger syndrome unlike other autism spectrum disorders, which have language delays and severe symptoms. AD is one of the mental illnesses commonly experienced among varied children during their childhood development process; thus, many children develop cognitive difficulties, language skill problems and lack effective nonverbal communication skills. The exact cause of AD is unknown but many researchers have attempted to base their arguments on the genetic basis as the major cause of asperger syndrome. Although there is no clear treatment for AD, cognitive behavioral therapy, social skills therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy and other intervention measures are among the effective therapies for improving symptoms and function of the patient. Mental Health History The client is a six years old child who grew up well and did not have any linguistic or speech problems but started experiencing some minor problems earlier at the age of five years. The child started having trouble in some basic elements of social skills including failure to make friendships with other children, lack of emotional reciprocity and impaired nonverbal behaviors. When the child was admitted in school, the teacher realized that the child displayed some repetitive behaviors, which were sometimes abnormal. Parents of the child also had already noticed earlier some displayed behaviors, activities and interests of the child which were repetitive but they could not take them seriously. Some of the behaviors of the child became apparent after the age of 5-6 years and this was the period their parents started seeking medical attention. For example, the child could memorize camera model figures but could care little about photography. Although these behaviors kept changing from time to time, they typically became narrowly focused and even dominated social interaction in the extent that the family members of the child became worried and stressed. According to Matson, Matson and Rivet (2007), repetitive motor behaviors are among the major symptoms for asperger syndrome but these behaviors tend to change from time to time. In addition, the client developed problems in understanding figurative language and ended up using language literary something that forced the teacher of the child to employ effective teaching intervention strategies and prepare Individualized Education programs in order to meet the demanding learning needs of the client. Although the child had excellent auditory and visual perception, some differences in perception with motor, emotion and sensory perception became apparent. The client was diagnosed and the diagnostic criteria required the treatment of the impairment social interaction, repetitive behaviors and many other problems. Rodriguez (2012) argues that employing effective diagnostic criteria and carrying out comprehensive assessment process in a multidisciplinary team approach is vital. Earlier intervention was carried out because AD does not have clear treatment but some therapies offered to the client included, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), social skill therapy, physical, speech therapy and other intervention programs were carried out. Assessment Process The first step of diagnosis is the assessment process, which includes observation and evaluating developmental history of the child. The medical professions or qualified social workers with experience should carry out assessment process in order to determine the causes and symptoms; thus offer effective ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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